ColorPlay: Year of Colour pt.2

I am not being a snob by spelling color as “colour”. That is how it is spelled on the app/website. You can try it out Year of Colour and find out what colors you post most.

I have been actively seeking out brightly colored images so my palettes would be virtually neutral free. The one from last week was too much fun to limit to one week. Also, I was busy and had to get on.

Year of Colour Rainbow Report
Year of Colour Rainbow Report

Last week I started with one of my iterations of my own Year of Colour. I finished with a mostly blue palette last time.

ColorPlay Jan 26 n.5
ColorPlay Jan 26 n.5

The blue led me to try an all pink palette. I threw in some very light purplish colors as well – Haze and Pearl Pink – before I got to all pink, because I thought they were pink circles. They, as I said, turned out to be very light purplish colors.

ColorPlay Jan 26 n.6
ColorPlay Jan 26 n.6

I did make it to an all pink palette. Very cheerful!

ColorPlay Jan 26 n.7
ColorPlay Jan 26 n.7

The pinks made me think of red. The palette above has some more pinky-reds/dusty rose colors – Coral and Melon – thrown in with the reds.

ColorPlay Jan 26 n.8
ColorPlay Jan 26 n.8

I tried an all green palette and couldn’t find/use enough greens. I barely use green in my quilts anymore. I had to add in the yellow so I didn’t have duplicates.

ColorPlay Jan 26 n.9
ColorPlay Jan 26 n.9

The pink and light purple palette from above made me think that there might still be possibilities, so I tried to go very light. Think this would make a lovely baby quilts.

ColorPlay Jan 26 n 10
ColorPlay Jan 26 n 10

As I said, I could have gone on forever, but I made one last orange palette for your quiltmaking pleasure. the oranges aren’t very bright, so the whole palette looks very Autumnal rather than Creamsicle

You might see this image again. I don’t think I even scratched the surface of this image. I think I can make many more palettes.

 

MQG Creative Webinar

Periodically, I am actually able to take advantage of some of the benefits of my MQG membership. Last week, I watched a webinar with Malka Dubrawsky on using prints called Creative Webinar: Printed and Patched: Designing with Patterned Fabric with Malka Dubrawsky.

My overall first impression was that there is an assumption that modern quiltmakers don’t use prints. I see a lot of MQG people buy lots of FQ collections. Wasn’t there some crazy hullabaloo over Heather Ross and some castle/princess collection a few years? Blueberry Park is pretty popular as well.

I tried to take this weird impression and set it off to the side so I could gain some knowledge from the webinar.

Malka said that prints have graphic information. There seemed to be another assumption that we are used to using small scale prints because they read as colors. She talked about using larger scale prints as graphic messaging. Dubrawsky said that using a variety, both large and small scale prints, creates interest.

She divided the presentation up into points:

  • spaces
  • movement
  • color/color contrast
  • common print
  • random

I think that I may have missed one or two points, but I got some good information out of these, so the webinar was worth my time.

When Malka talked about spaces she was talking about dividing up the quilt’s surface into different spaces. She, then, talked about using prints in those spaces. You can also organize blocks as spaces or into spaces to use prints.

Movement went right past me.

She used Color / Color Contrast as a different type of organizing tool, which I thought was interesting. One example was dividing up a quilt into warm/cool.  Again the idea was about organizing fabrics on the surface of the quilt so you can use printed fabrics. I don’t find this to be necessary in my work, but I thought the concept was interesting and it might be worth trying.

She encouraged makers to create rules for ourselves to use prints so they make sense across the surface. I do this with my quilts in general.

I had no idea what Dubawsky meant by Common Print. She was referring to using different colorways of the same prints all together. I have always loved this concept. I often like having all the prints in all the colors. Remember my Half Moon Modern drama? Malka says that it allows for easier color and shape focus.

She said that using prints can produce ‘hidden treasures’ that don’t show up when you use solids. Prints create another point of interest, more to look at.

Random: hard to make work, but can work. This was difficult for the presenter to explain and I can understand why. She threw out:

“Simple shapes, colors go together, big spaces. Active background electrify prints rather than toning them down. Focus is on color rather than design.”

Overall message is that makers need to organize your fabrics and design so that they work on the surface. She said that design is really important and I was thrilled.

She encourages people to make their own FQ packs.

Yay! She uses batiks all the time. She calls them modern batiks – modern, bold, graphic designs. Malka also said that she doesn’t really like the older style, watercolor-y batiks. I got the impression that it was the motifs on the surface of the fabric rather than the batik process she didn’t like.

To start: Pick (buy or create) a fabric collection you really love – she buys entire FQ bundle- and then play around with different ways of organizing fabrics. Small/large prints or warm/cool colors. Use a simple geometric design. Challenge yourself. I also got the impression that she was saying to be brave.

Her new designs will be available on Feb 1 on her website as PDFs. Printed patterns will be available Feb 20. She is also doing kits.

A recording of this webinar is on the MQG site for your viewing pleasure, if you are a member.

 

ColorPlay: Year of Colour

Last time I did a ColorPlay it was last year. HA! I was trying, again, to make a colorful palette and was moderately successful. This time I think I have done it!

Year of Colour Rainbow Report
Year of Colour Rainbow Report

I used one of the iterations of my Year of Colour report. I have no idea how so much beige got into the report, though I presume it is from my landscape and neighborhood photos. My neighborhood definitely needs more pink and turquoise houses.

ColorPlay Jan 26 default
ColorPlay Jan 26 default

Even the default is fabulous! I do like the Grellow paired with the Watermelon.

ColorPlay.Jan26 n.1
ColorPlay.Jan26 n.1

My first try was very fun and the result pleased me. I like the Coral, Melon and Bright pink combination. I think those colors would look great with the Grellow from above. I thought the Bright Pink would be more violet, a color I am enamoured with lately. Not so much, but I still like it.

I started from one edge to see what I could make. This image has the potential for a lot of palettes. Don’t worry, I won’t make you suffer through hundreds of iterations. 😉

ColorPlay Jan26 n.2
ColorPlay Jan26 n.2

My second try is even more fun. I would think it would be circusy, but it isn’t. I have to admit hunting around for the Papaya. I was actually looking for Grellow, as from above, but found the Papaya and really liked it with the various pinks.

ColorPlay Jan26 n.3
ColorPlay Jan26 n.3

Not sure what I was going for with n.3, but it is pleasing. It inspired me to try for an all blue palette.

ColorPlay Jan 26 n.4
ColorPlay Jan 26 n.4

I thought the all blue palette was too boring so I kept the Medium Pink. I like the combination, especially the Lagoon and the Medium Pink.

There are tons of opportunities for more from this image. I’ll post more next week.

 

Creative Spark #21: Fear

This is another spark I don’t want to confront or acknowledge. Bloomston, however tackles that exact issue in the first paragraph of the spark by saying “Creativity is my own version of anti-anxiety meds**. It’s a self-made panacea and it is usually effective….You can’t stay stuck in your fear if you are already wandering to your next creative project. Creativity is hope. (pg.89).”

After reading the above, I have to confront what I know about my own creativity related fear:

  • I am not afraid of fabric, piecing, new techniques. Frustrated sometimes: yes; afraid: no.
  • I am not afraid of what my next project will be (have you seen my list?)
  • I might be afraid of finishing all my projects and not knowing what to do next.
  • I am afraid of not having time to finish all of my projects.
  • I am not afraid of fabric combinations or combining fabrics.
  • I am not afraid of running out of fabric (can you say design challenge?).
  • I am afraid of not having enough: enough fabric (stop laughing!), enough thread, the right ruler, enough pins, etc.

Yes, I have fears, but I combat them using many methods. “Being creative is the answer right now (pg.90).” I have a goal to sew or draw or do something every day. This is not a 2018 New Year’s Resolution. I have had that goal for a long time and I just keep chipping away. Creating patterns using the Zentangle method is a new way to try and achieve that goal. “Creativity takes courage. It takes courage to be who you are. It takes courage to step into the unknown, to dig around in your soul and see what you find, to follow your passion, to start something new (pg.90).”

Bloomston provides some ways to be brave. I am not sure bravery combats creative fear, but it is worth considering. She suggests cultivating “beginner’s mind or shoshin (pg.90).” I like this idea. When you are a beginner, you don’t know that you can’t do something. I resized some blocks in my first quilt, not knowing that beginners didn’t really do that. I also found a block in an issue of Quilter’s Newsletter than I wanted to include. There were no templates or anything, so I had to redraft the block and make the templates. Nobody told me I couldn’t, so I did it. I finished my quilt and while it is isn’t perfect, I did it and wasn’t afraid. I wholeheartedly agree with beginner’s mind. I have been thinking about that lately and wanting to embrace it, thus the Zentangle class. I don’t know if I can capture that mindset with quiltmaking. It is hard to forget what I already know.

I do know that each quilt presents a new challenge. Putting blocks or units together is always a challenge.

“Fake it ’til You Make it (pg.90)” is a phrase with which I agree. I often do not feel confident in certain situations. I act confident and that projects confidence to others. Bloomston has some examples from a Ted Talk about how posture changes the body, which are interesting and worth thinking about. I like the idea of power posing she discusses.

You can see the last post on this topic from last week.

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

 

 

 

 

 

**This is not making an judgments about the need for any kind of mental health medication. If you are struggling, please contact your doctor or ask a friend to contact your doctor.

Gift Post #5: Zentangle

I took a class at A Work of Heart Studio in San Jose last week. My mom has been talking about learning the Zentangle technique, so I took her as a Christmas gift.

First two Zentangle tiles
First two Zentangle tiles

The class was 2 hours and we drew two tiles (3.5″ x 3.5″ squares of rag paper). In the course of the class we learned several patterns. The technique is a lot simpler than the finished product looks and I don’t think you need special powers to make a tile like I have drawn above. I followed the directions and piece by piece the finished tile evolved.

I went to Dick Blick with my mom and Lil Sissy (they both had gift cards)  and bought some Illustration Board ATCs. I have been drawing some more Zentangle patterns on those. I drew the first sets of patterns over and then started trying a new one.

This method reminds me of the type of drawing and materials I  used when I did the Creative Prompt Project Responses.

Tim ROCKS (and Quilts)

Terrain Donation Quilt
Terrain Donation Quilt

Tim is quickly becoming a quiltmaking rockstar. He got his new longarm and is back in the saddle. He seems to have found his place in quiltmaking. I think he is a quilting savant! If he isn’t at this moment, he is quickly working his way to that level.

Terrain Donation Quilt detail
Terrain Donation Quilt detail

 

 

 

He brought the Terrain donation quilt to Sew Day on Saturday and it really looks great. He quilted the sashing differently than the blocks. The sashing has the feathery swirl-like things and the blocks have a sort of cathedral window design. I commented on that style the last time we talked about quilting and the way Colleen quilts my quilts.

He decided to try it out. I am so impressed with how well he did the first time he tried it. He said that it took much longer than an all over pattern, but was pleased with the results.

Terrain Donation Quilt back
Terrain Donation Quilt back

He trimmed and applied the binding to the quilt at Sew Day, using the leftover backing to make the binding. It is really great to collaborate with him! I just have to piece donation quilts faster. 😉

ColorPlay: Tea Canisters

ColorPlay: Tea Canister -original
ColorPlay: Tea Canister -original

I went shopping with a friend the other day. Mostly I did not buy, but I did take a load of pictures.

This photo was taken in a small grocery store and I loved the different colors of the team canisters. Aren’t they cheerful?

ColorPlay: Tea Canister -default
ColorPlay: Tea Canister -default

As we would all predict, the default palette came out quite neutral based. The program placed the dots almost as far away from the colored canisters as was computerly possible.

I was pleased to see that Kona Mocha again, which is a lovely color…for brown. The Kona Sand looks more like oyster to me.

ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.1
ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.1

For my first image – the one I controlled – I went straight for the colors. this is definitely a circus type palette, which, I think, is kept from being too kid-like with that green. The green looks a little like the green in Jadeite housewares and dishes. It is definitely not sweet. The Grellow helps as well. Looking at the colors, I would say that they are all a little off. The Peridot and the Grellow stand out the most.

ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.2
ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.2

On my second palette, I still wanted color, but not the same colors. The Grellow turned into Butterscotch, which is not an appealing color. The green, now called Leprechaun, still looks good, but the blue, now Kona Coal, does not look cheerful at all. Still, somewhat better than neutrals.

ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.3
ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.3

Unintentionally, I made a warm palette. Almost all of the colors were Fallish or Thankgiving-ish. The names of the colors are comforting names.

I especially like the name Roasted Pecan, though the color looks more like Baby Poop Brown. I don’t suppose the name Baby Poop Brown would be a good marketing choice. How about those red-oranges? Aren’t they great?

ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.4
ColorPlay: Tea Canister -n.4

In an effort to embrace neutrals, I sought out neutrals for palette n.4. This is actually a nice palette, if you like neutrals. Kona Cinnamon is a great color, but I know that Chestnuts are definitely NOT that color.

I couldn’t resist adding some color, thus the purple, though it is called Crimson. I always thought of Crimson as more of a red, but who am I to argue with Robert Kaufman?

ColorPlay: Tea Canister n.5
ColorPlay: Tea Canister n.5

Finally, I wanted to get back to the bright colors. These look very similar to the colors in Palette n.1, but are not the same. I particularly like Noble Purple. Very nice color. I really Kona would be dyed on better greige goods.

Have fun with these palettes!

 

ColorPlay: Pumpkin Pie

ColorPlay: Pumpkin Pie
ColorPlay: Pumpkin Pie

In honor of Thanksgiving, I chose a picture of my pumpkin pie filling in process. I make a maple pumpkin pie. I found the recipe in a Bon Appetit magazine when I first contributed to Thanksgiving about a zillion years ago. Nobody has complained so I keep making it that way.

We remodeled our kitchen in about 2007 and it has red accents. We are very strict about what color appliances and accessories come into the kitchen. As a result, I received this food processor as a gift one year. I use it for all holiday food prep and it works really well.

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, default
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, default

I found out very quickly that the tight composition of the shot made for a very limited palette. The default palette, as we have found over the year, has a lot of neutrals. However, I found this to be a very warm palette.

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.1
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.1

I wanted to try and get more reds, more different reds, so I tried again.

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.2
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.2

n.2 has more reds, so I succeeded in that way. I am not that fond of Kona Caramel on its own, but with the reds, it does add something – perhaps a place for the eyes to rest?

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.3
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.3

I was able to get even more red tones in.3.  I also changed the Caramel to Kona Latte for a slightly different look. I might like Latte less than Caramel, but I haven’t decided. As with Caramel, it does add something to the heavy red palette.

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.4
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.4

I kept a red, but tried out a dark neutral palette. The buttons of the food processor are grey, so I was able to add in Kona Mocha, which I think might be off in terms of names, but it is a nice addition to the palette. Kona Ruby comes from my spoon rest (made by the YM) and I kept it in to keep the palette from becoming too neutral.

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.5
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.5

I tried an even more neutral palette for n.5, building on n.4. I, again, kept some red, but changed the specific red from Ruby to Kona Cotton Wine. I wouldn’t make a quilt from this palette, but can see it being used for a very chic house sale.

ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.6
ColorPlay: Pumpkin, n.6

Finally, for the last palette, I went for broke with the reds. I was pleased to see a Kona Lipstick show up! I love the name of that fabric. In this palette, the grey (Kona Mushroom) is the only neutral, though the Kona Mahogany could go either way in terms of it being one of the reds or a neutral

I know the differences are subtle between the palettes above, but it is interesting to see the changes one can make by moving the circles around a picture. As I have said before this is a good exercise.

What palettes have you made?

 

ColorPlay: Pier

A few weeks ago, I went to a conference in Monterey. For many reasons, Monterey is one of my favorite places and October is a great time to visit. I was fortunate that the weather was fantastic and I took some beautiful photos. You might see more from this trip later.

Monterey Bay Fisherman's Wharf
Monterey Bay Fisherman’s Wharf

I walk a lot and a path I was on gave me a great view of the pier and the Bay. I decided to use this for my next ColorPlay. What I expected was bright colorful palette.

ColorPlay:Pier default palette
ColorPlay:Pier default palette

As usual, the default palette was neutral. Might be a nice palette for a new house.

ColorPlay:Pier default palette
ColorPlay:Pier default palette

This one got a little better with the addition of the Cobblestone. I tried to doctor the palette with the addition of a more turquoise-y. Couldn’t do it. My photo just didn’t have the turquoise.

ColorPlay: Pier n.2
ColorPlay: Pier n.2

I decided to embrace the neutrals. This one is almost all grey with a blue-grey thrown in to liven things up.

ColorPlay: Pier n.3
ColorPlay: Pier n.3

The next neutral palette is a darker one. The Kona Spruce and Kona Stone is a really nice combination in the palette above.

ColorPlay: Pier n.4
ColorPlay: Pier n.4

The Kona Teal and Kona Everglade look similar, but are just a little bit different. Everglade is a tiny bit lighter. The gold adds a slightly different look. More like the day right after sunset.

I felt like I exhausted the options of this picture despite the promise, so I left the number of palettes at five.

Creative Spark #20: Mission Statement

This feels just like a vision board. Bloomston says “your mission statement is one way to water your grass” (pg.85). I’ll have to believe her and try.

“In this chapter we’ll write a so-called non-business ‘business’ plan — a creative mission statement” (pg.85). In the course of this exercise, she asks us to toss out the “Photoshopped perfectionism” (pg.85) of our creative life. We all know what that is, sometimes called Instagram. 😉 Creative life is not “all tied up in a pretty bow and stylized like a cool magazine lifestyle shot” (pg.85). We “have to start with” our “feet on the earth, even as” we “reach for the stars” (pg.85).

Carrie has a worksheet that will help us envision a creative life. She suggestions that we “look back in our family history” for a “passionate person,” a grandma who loved “to can peaches,” an “uncle who tinkered away in the garage making wooden benches” (pg.86) for inspiration. She wants us to “close your eyes and picture yourself in your creative life. See as many details as you can. Be specific” (pg.86).  The worksheet has good and specific directions for filling it out. Photocopy it so you can use it over and over.

You can see the last post on this topic from last week.

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

Creative Spark #19: Vision Board

Go and get your Little Spark book. We are back to fostering “a beginning, a seed, a whisper” (pg.6). Today  is all about vision boards and this is not my thing. Perhaps I don’t believe they will work, so they don’t work, though everyone who has used one says they do work. Perhaps I am just scared of making one and getting what I think I want?

Bloomstad says “A vision board is simply a collage of images you pull from magazines and other places and paste to a board. This exercise puts you directly in touch with your desires. It leaves you with a visual inventory of all the stuff that bubles up from your unconscious mind and hear to illuminate your path and remind you of what you want” (pg.81).

This is the spark that I wish I had a direct line to the author. I think it is my fear talking, but I have questions. Do I really want what I think I want?

The directions for making a vision board are pretty clear. “To make a vision board, tune into your heart and soul. Sidestep your mind by banishing your inner critic, judge, and editor. Those parts of yourself are not welcome for this exercise. Ask them to leave the building. Why? because you are only going to be listening to your desire. Not your desire for your partner, your children, your friends, or your family. Just your desire, for you” (pg.81).

Carrie gives a list of materials to the reader (pg.83) and directions:

  • “…don’t ‘should’ on yourself — no ‘I should pick this image’ or ‘I should want this one” (pg.83)
  • “When you see something you like rip it out” (pg.83)
  • “…for an hour, rip or cut out images. Then for the next hour paste them down” (pg.83)
  • ” Remove your notions of how pretty your board will look, how perfect, and let it just be…” (pg.83)
  • “Put your board in a spot where you can see it every day. After you look at your board and assimilate its wisdom, you may notice some themes” (pg.83)

She also gives some explanations, such as “sometimes we aren’t always aware of our own greatness  or even what awaits us. Using pleasure and desire as a guide keeps you in your heart and soul and out of your editor and judge” (pg.83)

Finally, Bloomston says something that doesn’t scare me. “New Year’s is a great time to make a new board for setting your intentions for the new year” (pg.83). I watch everyone else set intentions, pick a word, make New Years resolutions and I do nothing. Not because I don’t want to, but because I want to do something meaningful and sustainable. I can probably spend two hours making a vision board for my year. We’ll see.

 

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog from a few weeks ago.

ColorPlay: Shirt

ColorPlay: Shirt
ColorPlay: Shirt

I went to the Retreat last weekend. While there, SIL suggested I do a ColorPlay post on G’s shirt. I thought it would be great because there were a lot of bright-ish colors.

ColorPlay shirt default
ColorPlay shirt default

The default was …neutral, as usual. The Earth looks a little purple.

ColorPlay Shirt n.1
ColorPlay Shirt n.1

The first non-default palette is my favorite. I went to towards the turquoise. Ok, it isn’t really turquoise, it is Candy Green. I have never heard of Candy Green and that name kind of scares me.

ColorPlay Shirt n.2
ColorPlay Shirt n.2

Palette n.2 is an extension of palette n.1. I added a couple of neutrals. I am a fan of the gold, but it works well with the Ultramarine and the Deep Rose.

ColorPlay Shirt n.3
ColorPlay Shirt n.3

Palette n.3 is a combination of the neutral palette and my favorite, palette n.1. The Ultramarine stands out in this crowd. I also like the name of the Spice color.

ColorPlay Shirt n.4
ColorPlay Shirt n.4

Palette n.4 has colors that show up in other palettes. Although I see this as a more colorful image, I also realized that the embroidery was all of the same colors.

Have you made any interesting palettes lately? Please share.

ColorPlay: Freeway View

Freeway View
Freeway View

The weather this week has been good. It has not been deathly hot and there have been some lovely clouds. I took a photo while out on a lunchtime walk, which I decided to use for this week’s ColorPlay.

We are using Bella Solids instead of Kona Solids this week.

I tried to click the shutter when there were few cars, but you can still see them through the trees. I liked the green in front with the hills in the back. I prefer green hills, but still thought this was a lovely view.

ColorPlay Sept 22 default
ColorPlay Sept 22 default

The default, as we have discovered is normal, was heavily neutral. This palette looks like a 1970s decorator showcase house palette.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.1
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.1

I decided to try a monochromatic palette next. I was able to find six different blues in the photo. None of the colors are the bright turquoise I love, but the Little Boy Blue and Robin’s Egg aren’t bad.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.2
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.2

I decided to see if I could create another monochromatic palette and was mostly successful with green. I find the greens to be good greens for nature, but not bright enough for my quiltmaking.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.3
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.3

While really not my thing, I decided to try and make a palette with darks. I think I succeeded and I do like that dark blue. Otherwise, the palette looks more like the dresser of teenage boy than a palette I would use for a quilt.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.4
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.4

Next, I looked at combining the two monochromatic palettes to see if I could get something that I might actually use in a quilt. This is a nice palette. I really like the Dark Teal color. That makes this palette for me. I am still not much of a fan of the Avocado. The Leaf color is ok, though it takes on some of the qualities of the Avocado when sitting next to it.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.5
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.5

Finally, I wanted to see what I could do with the hills that wouldn’t produce a deadly beige palette. There is that Dove, which looks more beige than grey to me. This might make a nice soft boy baby quilt. It doesn’t have the contrast that people insist babies want/need, however.

Have you made any interesting palettes lately? Please share.

ColorPlay: Kahlo Detail

Kahlo: The Bride Who Becomes Frightened....
Kahlo: The Bride Who Becomes Frightened….

The image I chose comes from the detail of a painting by Frida Kahlo called The Bride Who Becomes Frightened When She Sees Life Opened. You can find more of the interpretation of this painting on the FridaKahlo.org website. I saw this painting at the  Heard Museum in Phoenix. It was one of an exhibit that was only making one other stop in the US.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail default
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail default

The default was very brown. I think it would make a good palette for a house. Someone else’s house – not mine, but the neutrals are appealing in some way. Perhaps I am getting used to them or am starting to be able to appreciate their value in the scheme of hues and tones.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail n.1
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail n.1

I moved the circles around to any colors just to get some colors. There is a sherbet/sorbet feel to the first palette I made. I like the Kona Amber, though I think it looks more like a perfectly ripe apricot.

 

ColorPlay Sept 15 n.2
ColorPlay Sept 15 n.2

This example clearly plays off of number 1. Where the hues in n.1 blend more, this one shows more contrast. Not tons, but some. the Kona Earth looks much different that the Kona Honey above.

ColorPlay Sept.15 n.3
ColorPlay Sept.15 n.3

I made some changes to the circles to try to get some brighter colors and the pink kind of fulfilled that dream. I do think that the colors Rivera and Kahlo use are a bit on the dull side – not horrible, but not as bright as I was looking for. Still, the Deep Rose and Gold look great together.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail - original
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail – original

Another detail I took was of this little owl. The fruit behind him/her makes it look like s/he has a big yellow beak, but I think the beak is actually small. I was fascinated by the feathers. I also liked the shape of his body. I don’t know if it is real or mythological owl (creature), but s/he is cute.

Creative Spark #18: The Pleasure Principle

I went to work on Tuesday still on a high from the sewing I completed over the weekend. I felt so good and wanted another day to prolong the feeling. I guess that is why it is so hard for those in recovery.

This spark is about seeking pleasure. “Your life is full and, no doubt, you have your hands full – with work, family, and other responsibilities. You probably don’t take many moments to check in with your desires because you are so busy working about everyone else’s” (pg.77). “Children seek pleasure at every turn. they don’t need reminders about how to have play, how to have fun, or how to make room for themselves. They know what feels good” (pg.77).

Bloomston asks what about ourselves?

Well? What about it?

I know that sewing makes me feel good. I must get a rush of endorphins when I accomplish certain tasks that my body craves, because I take every opportunity to sew.

Some of the challenge is about allotting limited resources (pg. 78). “Responsibilities, financial pressures, plans” (pg.78) and I would add guilt for doing something fun, “…are the reasons we forget to play and have fun” (pg.78). It is important to pursue creative activities that make you feel good otherwise you will forget how to be creative. Being creative requires practice. I find that I don’t flail around as much, because I am in the habit of being creative and I am in practice. I still struggle with the guilt of taking time to make quilts. I don’t know if I will ever get over the feeling that I am not doing something real. I may not get over it, but I don’t have to listen to the voice.

Ms. Carrie has a worksheet, which I think looks deceptively easy. the really good advice is “Unless you begin to uncover yourself from the bottom of the heaping, mountainous pile of your obligations and busyness, you might not get a crack of time to cultivate your creative self. That is why you need to get in touch again with what feels good, just for you. If you can begin to discover and uncover your desire, you can pursue the Spark” (pg.78).

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog a few weeks ago.