ColorPlay: Pier

A few weeks ago, I went to a conference in Monterey. For many reasons, Monterey is one of my favorite places and October is a great time to visit. I was fortunate that the weather was fantastic and I took some beautiful photos. You might see more from this trip later.

Monterey Bay Fisherman's Wharf
Monterey Bay Fisherman’s Wharf

I walk a lot and a path I was on gave me a great view of the pier and the Bay. I decided to use this for my next ColorPlay. What I expected was bright colorful palette.

ColorPlay:Pier default palette
ColorPlay:Pier default palette

As usual, the default palette was neutral. Might be a nice palette for a new house.

ColorPlay:Pier default palette
ColorPlay:Pier default palette

This one got a little better with the addition of the Cobblestone. I tried to doctor the palette with the addition of a more turquoise-y. Couldn’t do it. My photo just didn’t have the turquoise.

ColorPlay: Pier n.2
ColorPlay: Pier n.2

I decided to embrace the neutrals. This one is almost all grey with a blue-grey thrown in to liven things up.

ColorPlay: Pier n.3
ColorPlay: Pier n.3

The next neutral palette is a darker one. The Kona Spruce and Kona Stone is a really nice combination in the palette above.

ColorPlay: Pier n.4
ColorPlay: Pier n.4

The Kona Teal and Kona Everglade look similar, but are just a little bit different. Everglade is a tiny bit lighter. The gold adds a slightly different look. More like the day right after sunset.

I felt like I exhausted the options of this picture despite the promise, so I left the number of palettes at five.

Creative Spark #20: Mission Statement

This feels just like a vision board. Bloomston says “your mission statement is one way to water your grass” (pg.85). I’ll have to believe her and try.

“In this chapter we’ll write a so-called non-business ‘business’ plan — a creative mission statement” (pg.85). In the course of this exercise, she asks us to toss out the “Photoshopped perfectionism” (pg.85) of our creative life. We all know what that is, sometimes called Instagram. 😉 Creative life is not “all tied up in a pretty bow and stylized like a cool magazine lifestyle shot” (pg.85). We “have to start with” our “feet on the earth, even as” we “reach for the stars” (pg.85).

Carrie has a worksheet that will help us envision a creative life. She suggestions that we “look back in our family history” for a “passionate person,” a grandma who loved “to can peaches,” an “uncle who tinkered away in the garage making wooden benches” (pg.86) for inspiration. She wants us to “close your eyes and picture yourself in your creative life. See as many details as you can. Be specific” (pg.86).  The worksheet has good and specific directions for filling it out. Photocopy it so you can use it over and over.

You can see the last post on this topic from last week.

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

Creative Spark #19: Vision Board

Go and get your Little Spark book. We are back to fostering “a beginning, a seed, a whisper” (pg.6). Today  is all about vision boards and this is not my thing. Perhaps I don’t believe they will work, so they don’t work, though everyone who has used one says they do work. Perhaps I am just scared of making one and getting what I think I want?

Bloomstad says “A vision board is simply a collage of images you pull from magazines and other places and paste to a board. This exercise puts you directly in touch with your desires. It leaves you with a visual inventory of all the stuff that bubles up from your unconscious mind and hear to illuminate your path and remind you of what you want” (pg.81).

This is the spark that I wish I had a direct line to the author. I think it is my fear talking, but I have questions. Do I really want what I think I want?

The directions for making a vision board are pretty clear. “To make a vision board, tune into your heart and soul. Sidestep your mind by banishing your inner critic, judge, and editor. Those parts of yourself are not welcome for this exercise. Ask them to leave the building. Why? because you are only going to be listening to your desire. Not your desire for your partner, your children, your friends, or your family. Just your desire, for you” (pg.81).

Carrie gives a list of materials to the reader (pg.83) and directions:

  • “…don’t ‘should’ on yourself — no ‘I should pick this image’ or ‘I should want this one” (pg.83)
  • “When you see something you like rip it out” (pg.83)
  • “…for an hour, rip or cut out images. Then for the next hour paste them down” (pg.83)
  • ” Remove your notions of how pretty your board will look, how perfect, and let it just be…” (pg.83)
  • “Put your board in a spot where you can see it every day. After you look at your board and assimilate its wisdom, you may notice some themes” (pg.83)

She also gives some explanations, such as “sometimes we aren’t always aware of our own greatness  or even what awaits us. Using pleasure and desire as a guide keeps you in your heart and soul and out of your editor and judge” (pg.83)

Finally, Bloomston says something that doesn’t scare me. “New Year’s is a great time to make a new board for setting your intentions for the new year” (pg.83). I watch everyone else set intentions, pick a word, make New Years resolutions and I do nothing. Not because I don’t want to, but because I want to do something meaningful and sustainable. I can probably spend two hours making a vision board for my year. We’ll see.

 

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog from a few weeks ago.

ColorPlay: Shirt

ColorPlay: Shirt
ColorPlay: Shirt

I went to the Retreat last weekend. While there, SIL suggested I do a ColorPlay post on G’s shirt. I thought it would be great because there were a lot of bright-ish colors.

ColorPlay shirt default
ColorPlay shirt default

The default was …neutral, as usual. The Earth looks a little purple.

ColorPlay Shirt n.1
ColorPlay Shirt n.1

The first non-default palette is my favorite. I went to towards the turquoise. Ok, it isn’t really turquoise, it is Candy Green. I have never heard of Candy Green and that name kind of scares me.

ColorPlay Shirt n.2
ColorPlay Shirt n.2

Palette n.2 is an extension of palette n.1. I added a couple of neutrals. I am a fan of the gold, but it works well with the Ultramarine and the Deep Rose.

ColorPlay Shirt n.3
ColorPlay Shirt n.3

Palette n.3 is a combination of the neutral palette and my favorite, palette n.1. The Ultramarine stands out in this crowd. I also like the name of the Spice color.

ColorPlay Shirt n.4
ColorPlay Shirt n.4

Palette n.4 has colors that show up in other palettes. Although I see this as a more colorful image, I also realized that the embroidery was all of the same colors.

Have you made any interesting palettes lately? Please share.

ColorPlay: Freeway View

Freeway View
Freeway View

The weather this week has been good. It has not been deathly hot and there have been some lovely clouds. I took a photo while out on a lunchtime walk, which I decided to use for this week’s ColorPlay.

We are using Bella Solids instead of Kona Solids this week.

I tried to click the shutter when there were few cars, but you can still see them through the trees. I liked the green in front with the hills in the back. I prefer green hills, but still thought this was a lovely view.

ColorPlay Sept 22 default
ColorPlay Sept 22 default

The default, as we have discovered is normal, was heavily neutral. This palette looks like a 1970s decorator showcase house palette.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.1
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.1

I decided to try a monochromatic palette next. I was able to find six different blues in the photo. None of the colors are the bright turquoise I love, but the Little Boy Blue and Robin’s Egg aren’t bad.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.2
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.2

I decided to see if I could create another monochromatic palette and was mostly successful with green. I find the greens to be good greens for nature, but not bright enough for my quiltmaking.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.3
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.3

While really not my thing, I decided to try and make a palette with darks. I think I succeeded and I do like that dark blue. Otherwise, the palette looks more like the dresser of teenage boy than a palette I would use for a quilt.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.4
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.4

Next, I looked at combining the two monochromatic palettes to see if I could get something that I might actually use in a quilt. This is a nice palette. I really like the Dark Teal color. That makes this palette for me. I am still not much of a fan of the Avocado. The Leaf color is ok, though it takes on some of the qualities of the Avocado when sitting next to it.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.5
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.5

Finally, I wanted to see what I could do with the hills that wouldn’t produce a deadly beige palette. There is that Dove, which looks more beige than grey to me. This might make a nice soft boy baby quilt. It doesn’t have the contrast that people insist babies want/need, however.

Have you made any interesting palettes lately? Please share.

ColorPlay: Kahlo Detail

Kahlo: The Bride Who Becomes Frightened....
Kahlo: The Bride Who Becomes Frightened….

The image I chose comes from the detail of a painting by Frida Kahlo called The Bride Who Becomes Frightened When She Sees Life Opened. You can find more of the interpretation of this painting on the FridaKahlo.org website. I saw this painting at the  Heard Museum in Phoenix. It was one of an exhibit that was only making one other stop in the US.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail default
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail default

The default was very brown. I think it would make a good palette for a house. Someone else’s house – not mine, but the neutrals are appealing in some way. Perhaps I am getting used to them or am starting to be able to appreciate their value in the scheme of hues and tones.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail n.1
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail n.1

I moved the circles around to any colors just to get some colors. There is a sherbet/sorbet feel to the first palette I made. I like the Kona Amber, though I think it looks more like a perfectly ripe apricot.

 

ColorPlay Sept 15 n.2
ColorPlay Sept 15 n.2

This example clearly plays off of number 1. Where the hues in n.1 blend more, this one shows more contrast. Not tons, but some. the Kona Earth looks much different that the Kona Honey above.

ColorPlay Sept.15 n.3
ColorPlay Sept.15 n.3

I made some changes to the circles to try to get some brighter colors and the pink kind of fulfilled that dream. I do think that the colors Rivera and Kahlo use are a bit on the dull side – not horrible, but not as bright as I was looking for. Still, the Deep Rose and Gold look great together.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail - original
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail – original

Another detail I took was of this little owl. The fruit behind him/her makes it look like s/he has a big yellow beak, but I think the beak is actually small. I was fascinated by the feathers. I also liked the shape of his body. I don’t know if it is real or mythological owl (creature), but s/he is cute.

Creative Spark #18: The Pleasure Principle

I went to work on Tuesday still on a high from the sewing I completed over the weekend. I felt so good and wanted another day to prolong the feeling. I guess that is why it is so hard for those in recovery.

This spark is about seeking pleasure. “Your life is full and, no doubt, you have your hands full – with work, family, and other responsibilities. You probably don’t take many moments to check in with your desires because you are so busy working about everyone else’s” (pg.77). “Children seek pleasure at every turn. they don’t need reminders about how to have play, how to have fun, or how to make room for themselves. They know what feels good” (pg.77).

Bloomston asks what about ourselves?

Well? What about it?

I know that sewing makes me feel good. I must get a rush of endorphins when I accomplish certain tasks that my body craves, because I take every opportunity to sew.

Some of the challenge is about allotting limited resources (pg. 78). “Responsibilities, financial pressures, plans” (pg.78) and I would add guilt for doing something fun, “…are the reasons we forget to play and have fun” (pg.78). It is important to pursue creative activities that make you feel good otherwise you will forget how to be creative. Being creative requires practice. I find that I don’t flail around as much, because I am in the habit of being creative and I am in practice. I still struggle with the guilt of taking time to make quilts. I don’t know if I will ever get over the feeling that I am not doing something real. I may not get over it, but I don’t have to listen to the voice.

Ms. Carrie has a worksheet, which I think looks deceptively easy. the really good advice is “Unless you begin to uncover yourself from the bottom of the heaping, mountainous pile of your obligations and busyness, you might not get a crack of time to cultivate your creative self. That is why you need to get in touch again with what feels good, just for you. If you can begin to discover and uncover your desire, you can pursue the Spark” (pg.78).

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog a few weeks ago.

ColorPlay: Cherry Tree

I had a hard time finding a picture this week. I am not sure why.

ColorPlay: Cherry Tree
ColorPlay: Cherry Tree

Still, I love cherry trees, so I went with one this time. This was taken a few years ago, but I still like the detail. I am curious as the palettes.

ColorPlay: CherryTree default palette
ColorPlay: CherryTree default palette

I don’t dislike the default palette this time. I am interested in that there are so many purples.

ColorPlay: CherryTree n.2
ColorPlay: CherryTree n.2

I moved the circles around to see about getting a more pink palette.

ColorPlay: CherryTree n.3
ColorPlay: CherryTree n.3

I decided, shockingly, to try and make a palette with neutrals. HA! Lots of grey. It would make a good guy quilt.

ColorPlay: CherryTree n.4
ColorPlay: CherryTree n.4

Next I focused on the green to see what I could make.

This was actually a good exercise and I am pleased.

Creative Spark #17: Inspiration

Dolores Street Decoration
Dolores Street Decoration

The first headline of this spark is “Follow Fireflies. it made me think of my ‘What If’ game. The first line also sent my mind spinning. It reads “Inspiration is everywhere you look” (pg.73). I had just been walking down a street I frequent when I saw the decoration/gargoyle on a house. I thought it looked like a semi-wild cat. I like the detail (new houses have no character) and was amazed that I can still find things to see and be inspired by on a street I have walked down many times. I think having a  camera in my pocket gives me incentive to look more carefully at the world around me.  Bloomston also says “it can be commonplace or holy. It can catch you unaware and take away your breath. It can leave you speechless” (pg.73). I think I tend towards the commonplace – looking at the world around me, taking inspiration from the line of some bricks or some green growing in the crack of a sidewalk. At certain times of the year – not summer where I live – the sky and clouds can be quite dramatic. When I travel, I often find views and cityscapes that take my breath away. Architecture often amazes me because of the sheer scale of buildings built without computers. Noticing shape and line that inspires us is what Bloomston calls “the fireflies” (pg.73). She says “when we step into a life of chasing the fireflies of inspiration, we are more able to get into a creative space” (pg.73).

I find that I worry less when I am looking at the world around and making an effort to see the details – the beauty of the world around me. Carrie says that by getting into a more creative space “we create a fluency between our so-called normal life and our creative life” (pg.73). I find that there is less of a difference between the lives or parts of our lives. That lessening of space makes it easier to move between the two. The author further says “inspiration is often just a pebble thrown onto the path. It is up to you to stop, stoop down, and investigate it” (pg.73).

Ms. Bloomston has four suggestions: “slowdown, daydream, unplug, have a net” (pg.74). Unplug speaks to me today. I have been listening to many, many audiobooks. Lately, I have to think a lot and I can’t keep track of the story, so I haven’t been listening to as many audiobooks. I realized that, while I was very much enjoying listening to stories on audio, I was escaping and keeping my mind entertained so it wouldn’t dwell on the political situation or other bad things with which I was struggling. Now that I have less time to listen, I am allowing my mind to wander a bit. It does go to the dark places, but not as often. By not engaging it with audio 24/7, I am giving it space to think creatively as well. I am getting back into the groove of daydreaming. I think I am also learning to let my mind wander and touch on various topics, let it make connections between things.

As usual, Carrie Bloomston has some worksheets (pg.75). Go get your copy and fill them out. Think about what you are writing as you fill in the worksheet and let it inspire your creativity.

 

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog a few weeks ago.

Colorplay: Glass n.2

AirBnB leaded Glass Window
AirBnB leaded Glass Window

I decided to use this photo again and try to make palettes with Kona colors and see the differences. Obviously, I am going to try to put the dots in the same place.

You can see my first effort, from last week. I used Bella Solids on last week’s post. It was an accident. I meant to use Kona, but Bella was turned on so I went with it.

Leaded Glass-default-Kona
Leaded Glass-default-Kona

The default palette is very similar to last week’s default. I guess if there are no neutral colored areas in the uploaded image, it goes with similar colors or as close to neutral as possible.

I do like that very dark, Kona Espresso as an addition to the pinks. I think I would swap out the Crimson, though it looks more purple than crimson to me, to allow the Espresso to shine more.

Leaded Glass - palette n.1-Kona
Leaded Glass – palette n.1-Kona

The obvious differences in my first palette are the first red is darker and pink is more blush than grape. The first three colors (from left) are the stars as they were in the first Bella palette.

Kona Pool is such a great color and the yellow, Kona Wasabi, though looking much brighter on the bottom is a nice addition. I am not fond of the sand, but I am sure it would be a good unobtrusive hue to help the others shine.

Leaded Glass n.2-Kona
Leaded Glass n.2-Kona

I gave up doing a scientific experiment and just had some fun. The next palette had a circus feel.

The colors are not pure primaries, so I don’t think it looks kid-like. I think it looks very cheerful. The Baby Pink as well as the Tomato keep the whole palette from being too much like a young child’s playroom.

Leaded Glass n.3-Kona
Leaded Glass n.3-Kona

I tried for another cheerful palette and got one similar to the circus palette above, but with greyer hues. Not completely, because Pool and the Citrus are VERY cheerful. I am not sure I have seen citrus show up in a palette before (it must have and I didn’t notice). The Ultramarine and Grass Green make this palette into one that the parents of the children above could use.

Leaded Glass n.4-Kona
Leaded Glass n.4-Kona

The blues stood out to me. Since I can resist them I made a palette with blues and greens – towards the darker, tending towards neutral.

The plum was an unexpected addition. I can’t pretend it just happened, because I put the circles in place. I was surprised at how well it went with the greens, especially the Celadon.

Leaded Glass n.6-Kona
Leaded Glass n.6-Kona

I guess the neutrals have gotten to me, because I couldn’t finish the exercise without a neutral palette.

One thing I noticed is that I have to really notice all the colors when I made so many palettes. I didn’t notice the dark brown, actually Cocoa, when I started on this exercise last week. The Kona Pepper looks more dark blue to me than black, but it adds a tinge of optimism to the palette.

Leaded Glass n.5-Kona
Leaded Glass n.5-Kona

The Pepper with its blue tinges sent me off to make one more blue palette.

The Ivy, which isn’t a favorite allows the Oasis and the Holly colors to shine. This might be might favorite palette, but I am also partial to n.2 above.

It is really a lot more fun to use a photo with many colors. I’ll have to find some others to use and do it again.

 

Colorplay: Glass

AirBnB leaded Glass Window
AirBnB leaded Glass Window

Today, I decided to try a photo that was super colorful. This is a leaded glass window I saw in a house on Guerrero Street. It is an AirBnB and my friend stayed there. I saw it when I dropped her off. the female shape in front of it is a statue. I am going to focus on the glass.

Apparently, I chose Bella Solids this time.

Leaded Glass- default palette
Leaded Glass- default palette
Leaded Glass palette n.1
Leaded Glass palette n.1

The first palette, always the default, is very grape heavy. It isn’t unpleasant at all. I am struck at the similarities in the colors chosen by the program. Although, the hues provided tend to be somewhat dusky, the Bella Off-White seems have a pink tone when put next to the grapes and pink fabrics.

My first palette looks very circus-y. The Bella Sunflower next to the Little Boy Blue looks very cheerful. I got the red – actually Mango – by moving the dot very slightly up on the same piece of glass.

Leaded Glass - palette n.2
Leaded Glass – palette n.2

The Bella Sprout really makes the second of my palettes. I wanted something different than the yellow, but was concerned about that Longhorn (gold-yellow). with the other colors, I think it works. This palette is probably my favorite.

Leaded Glass - palette n.3
Leaded Glass – palette n.3

My immediate reaction to the third of my palettes was that I didn’t like it. However, I looked again and while I have concerns about the Bella Avocado, I think, overall, it works.

The colors come from one flower and I know the light affected the colors appeared.

I might do this exercise again with Konas just to see the difference.

 

ColorPlay: Mt. Shasta

Mt. Shasta
Mt. Shasta

I totally forgot to do ColorPlay last week. I had a photo picked out and I completely forgot.

I took this photo from a plane window as I flew to Portland to see my broken YM. It was a gorgeous, gorgeous day in the Bay Area and all the way to Portland AND in Portland as well. There was no fog and no rain. For once, I sat by the window and took a bunch of photos. I was able to see my house from the plane window!

Shasta-default
Shasta-default

Out of the gate, I got a fabulous default. I really have no complaints and am tempted just to finish up here with this one palette and move on with my life.

Shasta- Palette n.1
Shasta- Palette n.1

The colors are limited. No pinks, no yellows. I did a second palette anyway and I got a similar palette as the default, but different as well. This is definitely a monochromatic palette that would only be suitable for a two color (not two fabric) quilt, but not a quilt with a lot of complicated piecing.

Shasta- palette n.2
Shasta- palette n.2

I ended up with a palette of slightly lighter blues. Still blues, but different. I thought I wouldn’t be able to get another blue, monochromatic palette.

Shasta- palette n.3
Shasta- palette n.3

I did one last palette. I am getting a lot of same colors, so this is the last.

Creative Spark #16: Have a Secret

Bloomston got an assignment from an art professor to go and make a secret piece. The class was to do it and not tell anyone. They weren’t to turn it in or ever talk about it. Having and keeping the secret was the assignment. Having a secret doesn’t mean going and destroying some public property and then never telling anyone because of the guilt. Guilt is not involved. Having a secret in this context means finding that the “reward is inside us” (pg.70). If you are doing your art to get attention or to post on Facebook, then this spark is for you. Don’t make things because you think they will sell; make things that come from your heart.

I decided at some point that I would create this blog for myself 1) as a chronicle of my quiltmaking work and 2) as tool for practicing my writing. It isn’t a secret since, presumably, you are reading it. While I adore comments and interactions with my readers, if I only wrote the blog for you, I would have stopped a long time ago. I don’t get enough comments to get motivated to keep writing. I do refer back to old posts often enough to make it worth it for me. My blog isn’t a secret, but I have gained the benefit of the secret status because I really do write it for me.

There is something about having a secret project to work on. “Your own creative voice can get a bit clouded by all the other voices you hear from peers and teachers. It can become confusing and difficult to listen to your own voice.” (pg.70). No Instagram comments saying followers “LOVE IT”. Nobody has to get it. Just you.

Journals are often very private. My husband knows I keep one, but he has never read it. He can read them all when I am dead.

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. There is a lot more to each spark than what I am writing and the original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog a few weeks ago.

ColorPlay: Pressed Glass #4

White & Red Pressed Glass - original
White & Red Pressed Glass – original

I still have some of the pressed glass photos from my trip to Indiana and wanted to try a few more palettes. I thought this color scheme would be an interesting challenge.

ColorPlay July 14-default
ColorPlay July 14-default

The default was, of course, in Jaye-world, not to my tastes. It isn’t horrendous. The Silver and Pewter, as well as the Primrose are all nice. The Cayenne adds some zing.

I did think it was interesting that most of the circles were clustered in the top of the photo. Not all, but most.

It is a little dusty for my tastes – the colors are not clear. It is good that I could try again.

ColorPlay July 14 - n.1
ColorPlay July 14 – n.1

The second palette, the first where I moved the circles, was much more focused on the reds. I intentionally kept the circles to the top row of vessels and tried to get as many reds as possible.

As you can see there is a Peach, Pale Flesh and Spice, which are tones and shades of red, but not strictly red.

There might not be enough contrast in this palette for a quilt where one really wanted to show off the piecing, but for a subtly shaded quilt, it would be great.

ColorPlay July 14 - n.2
ColorPlay July 14 – n.2

In the third palette, my second, I tried to go for bright and cheerful.

Success! The combination seems cheerful to me and all of the colors go together.

This palette also has Peach in it and I noticed that the peach looks very different next to the Butterscotch than it does above next to the Sienna. I have always wanted to play around with putting one color next to a bunch of different ones to see the effect of the different colors on the one. Someday, perhaps.

ColorPlay July 14 - n.3
ColorPlay July 14 – n.3

My third, the fourth total palette, uses the middle of the image. This is a challenge on a couple of levels based on the question “what color is clear?”. Well, our eyes say something different than the Palette Builder tool. The Palette Builder tool has to assign a Kona fabric color. I knew that this palette would be wintery.

It is. The greys and blues are colors I would use for a snowy landscape quilt. Some of the darker greys are a little depressing for me, but I do like the Silver and the Oyster is okay, too.

ColorPlay July 14 - n.4
ColorPlay July 14 – n.4

I wanted to see if I could make a very different palette in the same area of the photo. I ended up moving the circles down to the next row on the photo.

My idea didn’t work very well. The two palettes are very similar with the addition of Bison (hilarious name if you have ever seen a Bison).

Stone shows up, which is repeat, as does Ash, which is not. Ash is another one of the Konas that I really like.

ColorPlay July 14 - n.5
ColorPlay July 14 – n.5

I was running out of photo, but I decided to try with the white and clear pressed glass one more time and see what I could come up with.

Another wintery landscape palette with some more blue tints added. Some of my favorite Konas are included: Ash, Snow and Silver. The Shale was an unexpected addition. I think the Shale gives the whole palette an icy feel.

I think I went in with a different mindset this time and was much more openminded about the palettes. The Palette Builder is a great and fun tool. Try it out! Let me know if you make anything with any of these palettes.

 

 

 

Creative Spark #15: Doubt

Remember the Crazies in Spark #4? I think Doubt is related, but the Crazies prevents us from doing things while Doubt makes **me** think I can’t do something and should just continue on as I am. Doubt prevents me from taking risks. Not knowing the outcome is scary.

Bloomston says we have to trust the process. She says to “befriend your doubt…. Maybe even nicely ask your doubt to leave.” (pg.65). Hhmm. I have never tried this. She says that “When we are trying to get rid of something, we expend a lot of energy and we are unwittingly feeding it.” (pg.65). This is interesting and really makes me stop and think. If I have doubts, are they creating other doubts – inviting their friends to the party?

Bloomston has four ways of removing doubt: Rituals, Music, Affirmations and Talismans. Rituals spoke to me most. We do not “…have enough rituals in our modern culture…” (pg.65). To each his own, but I feel this is true for myself. I have created some quiltmaking rituals:

  • I turn on all of the switches and things in the same order.
  • I check all of my tools: are they in the right place? Are there any issues I need to resolve?
  • then I get started with the step I have set up unless I have been working through a construction problem in my mind and am ready to tackle it.
  • When I finish for the day, I always set up the next step so I can get started right away when I have a moment.

Perhaps I have more rituals, but I will have to think about what they are.

Carrie Bloomston describes a talisman as “…an object believed to contain certain magical properties that may provide good luck or fortune.” (pg.66). I definitely have talismen. I have a little shrine of photos of people closest to me. In that same space I have some objects that I care about: a shell, a smooth glass heart, some rocks with words – courage, peace, healing – carved into them. I also have a rotating ATC and a few other things there as well. There are a few places where I have placed things I care about. I guess these all could be called mini-shrines. I never really thought about it because I have created these instinctively, but these are my talismen.

What are your rituals?

What are your talismen?

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. There is a lot more to each spark than what I am writing and the original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog several weeks ago.