ColorPlay: Shirt

ColorPlay: Shirt
ColorPlay: Shirt

I went to the Retreat last weekend. While there, SIL suggested I do a ColorPlay post on G’s shirt. I thought it would be great because there were a lot of bright-ish colors.

ColorPlay shirt default
ColorPlay shirt default

The default was …neutral, as usual. The Earth looks a little purple.

ColorPlay Shirt n.1
ColorPlay Shirt n.1

The first non-default palette is my favorite. I went to towards the turquoise. Ok, it isn’t really turquoise, it is Candy Green. I have never heard of Candy Green and that name kind of scares me.

ColorPlay Shirt n.2
ColorPlay Shirt n.2

Palette n.2 is an extension of palette n.1. I added a couple of neutrals. I am a fan of the gold, but it works well with the Ultramarine and the Deep Rose.

ColorPlay Shirt n.3
ColorPlay Shirt n.3

Palette n.3 is a combination of the neutral palette and my favorite, palette n.1. The Ultramarine stands out in this crowd. I also like the name of the Spice color.

ColorPlay Shirt n.4
ColorPlay Shirt n.4

Palette n.4 has colors that show up in other palettes. Although I see this as a more colorful image, I also realized that the embroidery was all of the same colors.

Have you made any interesting palettes lately? Please share.

Heard Museum, Part 4: Random Inspiration

Last week, I wrote about the silver collection. Earlier I also talked about the Katsina collection at the Heard Museum. I really could have taken a photo of each Katsina, but I tried restraint instead. The week before, I talked about the Kahlo / Rivera Exhibit.

I only had about two hours to see the whole museum, so I had to focus. the collections described above were mostly the collections on which I focused. As I walked around I saw a few other random items that inspired me.

Hopi Baskets, 1968-69
Hopi Baskets, 1968-69

In an exhibit about weddings, there were numerous items related to that event. One was a beautiful flat basket.

One of the things I like about this basket is the texture combined with the color. I think it would look great on a wall. I also liked the description “Numerous baskets were made by the bride’s family and given to the groom’s family” (Heard Museum information). This information, brief as it is, seems to imply that the groom rather than the bride was the property and the bride’s family had to pay for “the property.” 😉

You know I like metalwork, if you saw my Art Institute of Chicago post. I find grilles and grates to be good sources of inspiration for machine quilting designs. I thought these would be great all over designs. They are also simple and would be nearly continuous.

Dextra Quotskuyva, Hopi-Tewa. Jar, 1976
Dextra Quotskuyva, Hopi-Tewa. Jar, 1976

The thing I like about this pot/bowl is the design around the outside. A quick glance shows a flower, but if you look closer, you see some small birds, butterflies or flying insects. They remind me of dragonflies. I like the way they are integrated into the design of the bowl itself. I keep trying to think of ways to do this with a quilt. It might not be possible, but I am thinking.

Inside of an example log house
Inside of an example log house

I thought this was interesting.  It is a painting housed inside of a Navajo hogan, made of cedar and adobe. You can see the painting in situ in an image on the museum site as part of the exhibit, HOME: Native People in the Southwest.

This museum is well worth a visit. There is a lot to see, so if you go to visit, plan to spend some time there.

Heard Museum, part 3: Silver

Last week, I talked about the Katsina collection at the Heard Museum. I really could have taken a photo of each Katsina, but I tried restraint instead. The week before, I talked about the Kahlo / Rivera Exhibit. This museum is well worth a visit. There is a lot to see, so if you go to visit, plan to spend some time there.

Phillip Honanie, Hopi, Necklace, 1970s
Phillip Honanie, Hopi, Necklace, 1970s

In addition to the Kahlo / Rivera Exhibit and the Katsinas, the musem has a collection of silver pieces that are quite beautiful. They make me want to be part of an organization that has rituals that use such beautiful items. The necklace, though more modern, has really gorgeous designs adorning it.

In quiltmaking, I can see using this necklace as inspiration for handquilting or applique’. I don’t know if it is the metal, but the designs also remind me of the metal grates and grilles I saw at the Art Institute of Chicago in 2012.

One of my favorite pieces was a vessel. Enlarge the pictures so you can see the lovely lines on the lid and the droplets, or pussy willows, on the side of the container. I also like the hexagonal shape. The top could be used as machine quilting inspiration.

There were a number of other lovely pieces that were inspiring to me.

ColorPlay: Freeway View

Freeway View
Freeway View

The weather this week has been good. It has not been deathly hot and there have been some lovely clouds. I took a photo while out on a lunchtime walk, which I decided to use for this week’s ColorPlay.

We are using Bella Solids instead of Kona Solids this week.

I tried to click the shutter when there were few cars, but you can still see them through the trees. I liked the green in front with the hills in the back. I prefer green hills, but still thought this was a lovely view.

ColorPlay Sept 22 default
ColorPlay Sept 22 default

The default, as we have discovered is normal, was heavily neutral. This palette looks like a 1970s decorator showcase house palette.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.1
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.1

I decided to try a monochromatic palette next. I was able to find six different blues in the photo. None of the colors are the bright turquoise I love, but the Little Boy Blue and Robin’s Egg aren’t bad.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.2
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.2

I decided to see if I could create another monochromatic palette and was mostly successful with green. I find the greens to be good greens for nature, but not bright enough for my quiltmaking.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.3
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.3

While really not my thing, I decided to try and make a palette with darks. I think I succeeded and I do like that dark blue. Otherwise, the palette looks more like the dresser of teenage boy than a palette I would use for a quilt.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.4
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.4

Next, I looked at combining the two monochromatic palettes to see if I could get something that I might actually use in a quilt. This is a nice palette. I really like the Dark Teal color. That makes this palette for me. I am still not much of a fan of the Avocado. The Leaf color is ok, though it takes on some of the qualities of the Avocado when sitting next to it.

ColorPlay Sept 22 n.5
ColorPlay Sept 22 n.5

Finally, I wanted to see what I could do with the hills that wouldn’t produce a deadly beige palette. There is that Dove, which looks more beige than grey to me. This might make a nice soft boy baby quilt. It doesn’t have the contrast that people insist babies want/need, however.

Have you made any interesting palettes lately? Please share.

Heard Museum Part 2: Katsina

Katsina Information, Heard Museum, Phoenix
Katsina Information, Heard Museum, Phoenix

Katsinas are a Hopi tradition.

Katsina collection, Heard Museum Phoenix
Katsina collection, Heard Museum Phoenix

The Heard Museum has an amazing collection of Katsina dolls. Yes, I used the term Katsina instead of Kachina. The docent who showed us around said Katsina was the correct term. I really have no idea, so call them whatever you want.

“Katsinas are the spirit messengers of the universe. After death a Hopi continues a spiritual existence as a life-sustaining Katsina” (information at Heard Museum).

Hopi Katsina, Heard Museum, Phoenix
Hopi Katsina, Heard Museum, Phoenix

“The cultural and religious belief of Hopi is that Katsinas bring the katsina dolls in their likeness as gifts for young girls. Each gift repesents a prayer for good health, growth and fertility. With this daily reminder in the home, young girls remember the Katsinas and their teachings. Male family members may assist in the learning process by casually singing parts of the Katsina songs within the home to remind other of the prayer songs shared” (information at Heard Museum).

Katsina Doll, Heard Museum Phoenix
Katsina Doll, Heard Museum Phoenix

The black and white doll struck me as very funny. I don’t mean to demean another religion by laughing. He looks mischievous and cheerful. I sent the image to the YM and he enjoyed it.

Katsinas were carved at a variety of skill levels and with differing levels of detail. As people started to collect them, artists began carving them to sell rather than for children to play with.

Viewers can tell the difference between the toys and the made-to-sell pieces by looking at the bottom. The art pieces have a base, which make them easier to display.

I really liked the variety of facial expressions.

Part of Barry Goldwater's Collection, Heard Museum, Phoenix
Part of Barry Goldwater’s Collection, Heard Museum, Phoenix

The collection put together by Barry Goldwater is now in the Heard Museum.

The Goldwater display is separate from the others. The interesting part is the way the collection is displayed: older Katsinas at the top of the case, newer at the bottom. This arrangement makes it very easy to see the evolution of the Katsinas. The newer the doll, the more detailed it is and less likely it is intended for a child.

Ros George Katsina, Heard Museum, Phoenix
Ros George Katsina, Heard Museum, Phoenix

The Ros George Katsina is a good example of the type of Katsina made as art to sell.

I took a photo of this particular Katsina, because of the feathers. If you click on the photo so you can see it larger, you will see the fine carving on the wings and feathers.

ColorPlay: Kahlo Detail

Kahlo: The Bride Who Becomes Frightened....
Kahlo: The Bride Who Becomes Frightened….

The image I chose comes from the detail of a painting by Frida Kahlo called The Bride Who Becomes Frightened When She Sees Life Opened. You can find more of the interpretation of this painting on the FridaKahlo.org website. I saw this painting at the  Heard Museum in Phoenix. It was one of an exhibit that was only making one other stop in the US.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail default
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail default

The default was very brown. I think it would make a good palette for a house. Someone else’s house – not mine, but the neutrals are appealing in some way. Perhaps I am getting used to them or am starting to be able to appreciate their value in the scheme of hues and tones.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail n.1
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail n.1

I moved the circles around to any colors just to get some colors. There is a sherbet/sorbet feel to the first palette I made. I like the Kona Amber, though I think it looks more like a perfectly ripe apricot.

 

ColorPlay Sept 15 n.2
ColorPlay Sept 15 n.2

This example clearly plays off of number 1. Where the hues in n.1 blend more, this one shows more contrast. Not tons, but some. the Kona Earth looks much different that the Kona Honey above.

ColorPlay Sept.15 n.3
ColorPlay Sept.15 n.3

I made some changes to the circles to try to get some brighter colors and the pink kind of fulfilled that dream. I do think that the colors Rivera and Kahlo use are a bit on the dull side – not horrible, but not as bright as I was looking for. Still, the Deep Rose and Gold look great together.

ColorPlay: Kahlo detail - original
ColorPlay: Kahlo detail – original

Another detail I took was of this little owl. The fruit behind him/her makes it look like s/he has a big yellow beak, but I think the beak is actually small. I was fascinated by the feathers. I also liked the shape of his body. I don’t know if it is real or mythological owl (creature), but s/he is cute.

Heard Museum-PHX

Back in June, I went to Phoenix for work. It was that week that was incredibly hot and I was actually out and about in 119 degree heat. I won’t be doing that again.

I was invited to a vendor event at the Heard Museum. Since I had nothing better to do and enjoy visiting places unique to various cities, I went. I am not much of a fan of Native American art – I don’t hate it, it just doesn’t float my boat – though I can always find something to inspire me in ally types of exhibits.

I was incredibly pleased to see the various collections that were amazing and extremely inspiring.

Frida Kahlo/Diego Rivera Exhibit
Frida Kahlo/Diego Rivera Exhibit

They had an exhibit of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera pieces that I felt incredibly lucky to see. Not only were there paintings by the pair, but there were also photographs of the pair and their family. The exhibit was only going to be shown in one other place in the US (not sure what other city, sorry!) and that place was not in San Francisco.

Their paintings have a simplicity, without being simplistic that I like. This was the first time I had seen the sexual aspect of their paintings, as well. This was the first time I had seen paintings of a couple of Rivera’s patrons, the Gelmans. These paintings are great examples of simplicity, without being simplistic.

Kahlo had a number of self portraits in the exhibit. I really liked her hair in a number of them.

She also had some pretty interesting paintings, at least to me. The above photos show a “composition that borrows from the historical motif of the Virgin and the Child with St. Anne in which the saint embraces Mary and Jesus.” (from info at the museum). This is definitely not a boring picture and there is a lot to look at in it.

The bride who becomes frightened when she sees life opened by Kahlo and Landscape with cacti by Rivera are a couple of other interesting paintings. Again they have that simplicity (flatness of the paint application???) that I like, but are not simplistic.

The photographs gave a realistic glimpse into their lives and brought up the suggestion that both artists had other lovers.

Stay tuned for post coming to a blog near you of other art at the Heard Museum.

Phoenix Inspiration

Aside from what was at the Heard Museum, I found a lot of other details in the Phoenix area to be inspiring as well.

Phoenix floor
Phoenix floor

I saw a floor -probably in the airport or in a, gasp, horror, restroom- that I thought would make a fabulous modern style quilt.

I like the different sized squares and rectangles that comprise the columns. I wonder how many people use inspiration from tile to make their quilt designs?

I can see it with various solids in big and small pieces. I can also see it all in white with ‘grout’ between the white in very thin strips.

Airports are also full of inspiration, if they aren’t being remodeled yet again… I loved the Drawn to Pattern exhibit. The art pieces reminded me of the circle quilt I made with Gerre.

Sky Harbor Bridge floor
Sky Harbor Bridge floor

There were mosaic-type floors as well. This circular example was on the floor of the bridge to the light rail from Sky Harbor airport.

If you follow @parisfloors on Instagram you will recognize the format of the photo. while clogs are not excellent for hot weather they are very convenient for going through security in airports and also comfy for an unknown amount of walking.

Light rail art - Phoenix
Light rail art – Phoenix

I hadn’t been to Phoenix for many years, probably since my aunt died in 2006 and it looked really different to me. Of course, I stayed primarily near the convention center, which, I am sure, is built to give a good impression to tourists. There was some nice art and I enjoyed the light rail as well.

This piece of art I saw while riding the light rail would make a great quilt, too. I see some similarities to a piece of fabric that looked like New York Beauty or an extended New York Beauty quilt.

Phoenix Convention Center mosaic
Phoenix Convention Center mosaic

The convention center hosted a piece called The Earth Dreaming by Isaiah Zagar, 2008. It was a mosaic of the style I’d really like to use as back splashes in my bathroom.

There are more photos, so I will probably write another post on the topic. In the meantime, enjoy.

 

Creative Spark #18: The Pleasure Principle

I went to work on Tuesday still on a high from the sewing I completed over the weekend. I felt so good and wanted another day to prolong the feeling. I guess that is why it is so hard for those in recovery.

This spark is about seeking pleasure. “Your life is full and, no doubt, you have your hands full – with work, family, and other responsibilities. You probably don’t take many moments to check in with your desires because you are so busy working about everyone else’s” (pg.77). “Children seek pleasure at every turn. they don’t need reminders about how to have play, how to have fun, or how to make room for themselves. They know what feels good” (pg.77).

Bloomston asks what about ourselves?

Well? What about it?

I know that sewing makes me feel good. I must get a rush of endorphins when I accomplish certain tasks that my body craves, because I take every opportunity to sew.

Some of the challenge is about allotting limited resources (pg. 78). “Responsibilities, financial pressures, plans” (pg.78) and I would add guilt for doing something fun, “…are the reasons we forget to play and have fun” (pg.78). It is important to pursue creative activities that make you feel good otherwise you will forget how to be creative. Being creative requires practice. I find that I don’t flail around as much, because I am in the habit of being creative and I am in practice. I still struggle with the guilt of taking time to make quilts. I don’t know if I will ever get over the feeling that I am not doing something real. I may not get over it, but I don’t have to listen to the voice.

Ms. Carrie has a worksheet, which I think looks deceptively easy. the really good advice is “Unless you begin to uncover yourself from the bottom of the heaping, mountainous pile of your obligations and busyness, you might not get a crack of time to cultivate your creative self. That is why you need to get in touch again with what feels good, just for you. If you can begin to discover and uncover your desire, you can pursue the Spark” (pg.78).

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog a few weeks ago.

ColorPlay: Cherry Tree

I had a hard time finding a picture this week. I am not sure why.

ColorPlay: Cherry Tree
ColorPlay: Cherry Tree

Still, I love cherry trees, so I went with one this time. This was taken a few years ago, but I still like the detail. I am curious as the palettes.

ColorPlay: CherryTree default palette
ColorPlay: CherryTree default palette

I don’t dislike the default palette this time. I am interested in that there are so many purples.

ColorPlay: CherryTree n.2
ColorPlay: CherryTree n.2

I moved the circles around to see about getting a more pink palette.

ColorPlay: CherryTree n.3
ColorPlay: CherryTree n.3

I decided, shockingly, to try and make a palette with neutrals. HA! Lots of grey. It would make a good guy quilt.

ColorPlay: CherryTree n.4
ColorPlay: CherryTree n.4

Next I focused on the green to see what I could make.

This was actually a good exercise and I am pleased.

SIL’s Seasons Quilt

SIL #2 moved back here from Maryland last year. Since then she has been getting comments about how she must miss the seasons. We do have seasons here. They may not be the four radically dramatic seasons of the East coast, but we have seasons.

SIL's Season Quilt -in process
SIL’s Season Quilt -in process

Anyway, she has started her Seasons quilt and the first bit of it is AWESOME! Part of the awesomeness is the cutting, but the other is the Pointillist Palette fabric. The picture is not ideal, but you get the idea. The quilt shard is not on a curve surface, but the Pointillist Palette fabric and the placement makes it looked curved.

Pointillist Palette was a great fabric line. It cemented my friendship with TFQ. We bonded over fabric. 😉 It was one of the first fabric lines I bought. It was one of the first fabric lines I remember being marketed as a fabric line. There was a reissue of some of the colors and new colors last year. Both SIL and I have large collections of many of the colors. I still have the idea -and some hope- that I will finish my Pointillist Palette series. Seeing SIL”s piece gets me thinking about my PP series.

Creative Spark #17: Inspiration

Dolores Street Decoration
Dolores Street Decoration

The first headline of this spark is “Follow Fireflies. it made me think of my ‘What If’ game. The first line also sent my mind spinning. It reads “Inspiration is everywhere you look” (pg.73). I had just been walking down a street I frequent when I saw the decoration/gargoyle on a house. I thought it looked like a semi-wild cat. I like the detail (new houses have no character) and was amazed that I can still find things to see and be inspired by on a street I have walked down many times. I think having a  camera in my pocket gives me incentive to look more carefully at the world around me.  Bloomston also says “it can be commonplace or holy. It can catch you unaware and take away your breath. It can leave you speechless” (pg.73). I think I tend towards the commonplace – looking at the world around me, taking inspiration from the line of some bricks or some green growing in the crack of a sidewalk. At certain times of the year – not summer where I live – the sky and clouds can be quite dramatic. When I travel, I often find views and cityscapes that take my breath away. Architecture often amazes me because of the sheer scale of buildings built without computers. Noticing shape and line that inspires us is what Bloomston calls “the fireflies” (pg.73). She says “when we step into a life of chasing the fireflies of inspiration, we are more able to get into a creative space” (pg.73).

I find that I worry less when I am looking at the world around and making an effort to see the details – the beauty of the world around me. Carrie says that by getting into a more creative space “we create a fluency between our so-called normal life and our creative life” (pg.73). I find that there is less of a difference between the lives or parts of our lives. That lessening of space makes it easier to move between the two. The author further says “inspiration is often just a pebble thrown onto the path. It is up to you to stop, stoop down, and investigate it” (pg.73).

Ms. Bloomston has four suggestions: “slowdown, daydream, unplug, have a net” (pg.74). Unplug speaks to me today. I have been listening to many, many audiobooks. Lately, I have to think a lot and I can’t keep track of the story, so I haven’t been listening to as many audiobooks. I realized that, while I was very much enjoying listening to stories on audio, I was escaping and keeping my mind entertained so it wouldn’t dwell on the political situation or other bad things with which I was struggling. Now that I have less time to listen, I am allowing my mind to wander a bit. It does go to the dark places, but not as often. By not engaging it with audio 24/7, I am giving it space to think creatively as well. I am getting back into the groove of daydreaming. I think I am also learning to let my mind wander and touch on various topics, let it make connections between things.

As usual, Carrie Bloomston has some worksheets (pg.75). Go get your copy and fill them out. Think about what you are writing as you fill in the worksheet and let it inspire your creativity.

 

Nota bene: we are working through Carrie Bloomston’s book, The Little Spark. Buy it. Support the artist. Play along. There is much more to each spark than what I am writing. The original chapters will help you. Go buy Carrie Bloomston’s book, so you get the full benefit of her fabulousness! You can see my book review, which is what started this flight of fancy.

You can find the last spark on the blog a few weeks ago.

Colorplay: Glass n.2

AirBnB leaded Glass Window
AirBnB leaded Glass Window

I decided to use this photo again and try to make palettes with Kona colors and see the differences. Obviously, I am going to try to put the dots in the same place.

You can see my first effort, from last week. I used Bella Solids on last week’s post. It was an accident. I meant to use Kona, but Bella was turned on so I went with it.

Leaded Glass-default-Kona
Leaded Glass-default-Kona

The default palette is very similar to last week’s default. I guess if there are no neutral colored areas in the uploaded image, it goes with similar colors or as close to neutral as possible.

I do like that very dark, Kona Espresso as an addition to the pinks. I think I would swap out the Crimson, though it looks more purple than crimson to me, to allow the Espresso to shine more.

Leaded Glass - palette n.1-Kona
Leaded Glass – palette n.1-Kona

The obvious differences in my first palette are the first red is darker and pink is more blush than grape. The first three colors (from left) are the stars as they were in the first Bella palette.

Kona Pool is such a great color and the yellow, Kona Wasabi, though looking much brighter on the bottom is a nice addition. I am not fond of the sand, but I am sure it would be a good unobtrusive hue to help the others shine.

Leaded Glass n.2-Kona
Leaded Glass n.2-Kona

I gave up doing a scientific experiment and just had some fun. The next palette had a circus feel.

The colors are not pure primaries, so I don’t think it looks kid-like. I think it looks very cheerful. The Baby Pink as well as the Tomato keep the whole palette from being too much like a young child’s playroom.

Leaded Glass n.3-Kona
Leaded Glass n.3-Kona

I tried for another cheerful palette and got one similar to the circus palette above, but with greyer hues. Not completely, because Pool and the Citrus are VERY cheerful. I am not sure I have seen citrus show up in a palette before (it must have and I didn’t notice). The Ultramarine and Grass Green make this palette into one that the parents of the children above could use.

Leaded Glass n.4-Kona
Leaded Glass n.4-Kona

The blues stood out to me. Since I can resist them I made a palette with blues and greens – towards the darker, tending towards neutral.

The plum was an unexpected addition. I can’t pretend it just happened, because I put the circles in place. I was surprised at how well it went with the greens, especially the Celadon.

Leaded Glass n.6-Kona
Leaded Glass n.6-Kona

I guess the neutrals have gotten to me, because I couldn’t finish the exercise without a neutral palette.

One thing I noticed is that I have to really notice all the colors when I made so many palettes. I didn’t notice the dark brown, actually Cocoa, when I started on this exercise last week. The Kona Pepper looks more dark blue to me than black, but it adds a tinge of optimism to the palette.

Leaded Glass n.5-Kona
Leaded Glass n.5-Kona

The Pepper with its blue tinges sent me off to make one more blue palette.

The Ivy, which isn’t a favorite allows the Oasis and the Holly colors to shine. This might be might favorite palette, but I am also partial to n.2 above.

It is really a lot more fun to use a photo with many colors. I’ll have to find some others to use and do it again.

 

Colorplay: Glass

AirBnB leaded Glass Window
AirBnB leaded Glass Window

Today, I decided to try a photo that was super colorful. This is a leaded glass window I saw in a house on Guerrero Street. It is an AirBnB and my friend stayed there. I saw it when I dropped her off. the female shape in front of it is a statue. I am going to focus on the glass.

Apparently, I chose Bella Solids this time.

Leaded Glass- default palette
Leaded Glass- default palette
Leaded Glass palette n.1
Leaded Glass palette n.1

The first palette, always the default, is very grape heavy. It isn’t unpleasant at all. I am struck at the similarities in the colors chosen by the program. Although, the hues provided tend to be somewhat dusky, the Bella Off-White seems have a pink tone when put next to the grapes and pink fabrics.

My first palette looks very circus-y. The Bella Sunflower next to the Little Boy Blue looks very cheerful. I got the red – actually Mango – by moving the dot very slightly up on the same piece of glass.

Leaded Glass - palette n.2
Leaded Glass – palette n.2

The Bella Sprout really makes the second of my palettes. I wanted something different than the yellow, but was concerned about that Longhorn (gold-yellow). with the other colors, I think it works. This palette is probably my favorite.

Leaded Glass - palette n.3
Leaded Glass – palette n.3

My immediate reaction to the third of my palettes was that I didn’t like it. However, I looked again and while I have concerns about the Bella Avocado, I think, overall, it works.

The colors come from one flower and I know the light affected the colors appeared.

I might do this exercise again with Konas just to see the difference.

 

ColorPlay: Mt. Shasta

Mt. Shasta
Mt. Shasta

I totally forgot to do ColorPlay last week. I had a photo picked out and I completely forgot.

I took this photo from a plane window as I flew to Portland to see my broken YM. It was a gorgeous, gorgeous day in the Bay Area and all the way to Portland AND in Portland as well. There was no fog and no rain. For once, I sat by the window and took a bunch of photos. I was able to see my house from the plane window!

Shasta-default
Shasta-default

Out of the gate, I got a fabulous default. I really have no complaints and am tempted just to finish up here with this one palette and move on with my life.

Shasta- Palette n.1
Shasta- Palette n.1

The colors are limited. No pinks, no yellows. I did a second palette anyway and I got a similar palette as the default, but different as well. This is definitely a monochromatic palette that would only be suitable for a two color (not two fabric) quilt, but not a quilt with a lot of complicated piecing.

Shasta- palette n.2
Shasta- palette n.2

I ended up with a palette of slightly lighter blues. Still blues, but different. I thought I wouldn’t be able to get another blue, monochromatic palette.

Shasta- palette n.3
Shasta- palette n.3

I did one last palette. I am getting a lot of same colors, so this is the last.