Design Wall Monday – February 2019

The last time I did this was back in November. I am not sure why I don’t do it more often. I guess I don’t think about it unless I happen to have a photo of my design wall handy. In this case, Vicki, over at My Creative Corner 3, asked for a picture of what was on our design wall. This is a two birds, one stone kind of post.

Design Wall - February 2019
Design Wall – February 2019

Not much on my design wall this week. Mostly its because I am in between projects -sort of.

Design Wall Feb 2019 - annotated
Design Wall Feb 2019 – annotated
  1. [The Damn] Lobster – Yes, it is still there glaring at me. I really need to do finish this piece. I had an inkling of wanting to do it last week, but it passed.
  2. Fabric of the Year 2018 (and maybe 2019) squares – I am now two quilts behind in the series – 2017 and 2018. FOTY 2017 has been on the design wall recently and will be again. I am re-sorting and counting rectangles so I know the dimensions. I still want to do my Ellsworth Kelly idea for FOTY 2018. I haven’t decided even what shape to use for FOTY 2019. I wondered yesterday if I should combine FOTY 2018 and 2019. It doesn’t fit with the series so far, but if I want to explore the same idea I could just do it once, though doing it twice using the same shape would allow me to use different greys or a black on each one.
  3. Jenny One Block Halo quilt block – This is a test block for the Jen Kingwell/ Jenny from One Block quilt I call Ring Toss.  I thought about making a quilt using this pattern after I bought the templates at PIQF. I really like the templates and the idea of the quilt, but the pieces are too small. This block requires more space. I designed the block in EQ, surviving a rare polygon error, and have yet to print the templates in the larger size. My goal is to try a block in the larger size and see if I want to commit to that quilt. I won’t have the templates, so it won’t be as convenient. I might just give it up. As you know, I have a lot of projects and don’t need anymore.
  4. Spiky 16 patches – These are the blocks for the third Spiky 16 patch donation quilt. I haven’t put it together yet. It is pinned out of the way so I could fit the Green Thing on the design wall and see what I was doing. I haven’t unpinned them, but now that I have finished the other two donation tops on which I was working I can make these blocks into a top.
  5. Mini pre-anything potential donation block – I had one leftover 9 patch from the Octagon 9 Patch. I want to make a donation block out of it, but haven’t quite gotten to it yet. The pieces surrounding it were potential improv additions.
  6. Green donation block in process – as I finished the Green Thing, I needed some leaders and enders, so I  went back to the regular BAM donation blocks and this one is progressing.
  7. Jen Carlton Bailly blocks that I cut wrong – Well, I cut the two circle blocks wrong. The HST is waiting for something to be done to it. I used its sister to try out another technique in the class.
  8. Improv donation block – I did like using up scraps to make the Green Thing. It became unwieldy and heavy and not ideal, so I am not sure I want to do another that large. Yes, I could make it smaller, but I like even baby quilts to be on the larger side. I decided to try making some blocks instead. If I make a bunch of 8.5 inch blocks, they will fit with the 16 patches the guild makes. I can also make enough of them to put together a quilt with just improv blocks. This might be the only one. We’ll see.

I am linking up with Small Quilts and Doll Quilts, the hosting site of Design Wall Monday.

Under the Sea Top Finished

Under the Sea finished top
Under the Sea finished top

After several false finishes, I am really done with the top of Under the Sea. This is a HUGE, because I started it in April of 2009 and getting it done has been on my list for awhile. One less handwork project to do can’t be bad either.

I want to make it into a small pillow. Some of the embroidery and beading are close to the edge, so I have to worry about that a little bit. There is still work to do on this piece.

Since this was heavily embellished, I will enter it in the fair in the embellishment category and hope for a prize.

Hooray for progress.

Finished: Green Thing Top & Back

Green Thing donation top
Green Thing donation top

I finished the Green Thing Top and Back in time to take it to BAM today.

I am worried about someone quilting it as there are a lot of small pieces. I tried to press seams open. There was less matching of points, so it made sense.

I don’t know that I’ll do this type of thing again. There are some benefits: I can see part of the bottom of my green scraps drawer and there is no matching of seams. Still, though, the end of the process wasn’t as leaders and enders friendly as I would have liked. I am going to try to make a few 8.5 inch improv blocks and see what someone else will do with them. That should get rid of scraps, too.

Green Thing donation back
Green Thing donation back

The back went together pretty easily. I used some fabrics that had been hanging around awhile. I always liked that green bubble dot print, but I never found a project in which to use it, so off it goes to make way for newer fabrics.

Book Review: Quilt Improv

Quilt Improv: Incredible Quilts from Everyday InspirationsQuilt Improv: Incredible Quilts from Everyday Inspirations by Lucie Summers

I am not enamoured of improv. I feel like the design potential of improv is overshadowed by sloppy choices and bad workmanship. I think improv is a valid way of expressing creativity. You have seen me make quilts in the improv style. It is not a way to avoid knowing how to make a technically sound quilt. Of course, I can’t say this very often because people take it the wrong way.

Lucie Summers agrees with me. She says in her introduction to this book “One of the my biggest bugbears about improv is when others assume ‘just because it’s improv’ workmanship doesn’t matter. Of course, it matters! Badly made quilts, whether traditional or not, are just badly made quilts. By badly made, I’m not talking about whether your seams or patchwork points match, I’m talking about fabrics sloppily stitched together so there are holes” (pg.4). I was really pleased to read this, because I think, and have always thought, workmanship matters. You will often see in my posts about project some lines about identifying a mistake and deciding whether I could live with it. Workmanship matters. I like Lucie Summers.

I am just as surprised as you that I picked up this book. I am wary of books on improv, because it is improv. Why do you need a book? You certainly don’t need patterns. Cheryl had it at Sew Day and something about it drew me in. I leafed through the images and was interested in the colors and shapes. I checked it out of the library so I could peruse it a little more.

I like the way Lucie has written the prose. The style is friendly and approachable and, even for me, she has a reasonable way of explaining improv in a true fashion. Also, she isn’t condescending.

The book starts out with an introduction. In this introduction is my favorite quote (above) and a little bit about how she works, what working with scissors means, piles of scraps and the use of measuring in improv (pg.4). The introduction is followed by a section called “How I Work” (pg.6) which details piecing maps, inspiration and another fabulous quote “…as you embark on making a quilt from the gallery to make it yours. Give it your personality. Don’t search high and low for the exact blue dotty fabric I’ve used in the top right-hand corner of quilt number 6 – use a grey floral, or an orange solid, whatever… Make it yours, relax and have a huge amount of fun. At the end of the day we’re not saving lives here, we’re cutting into fabric and stitching it back together” (pg.6). This is so critical to me. I have made a few exact replicas of quilts in magazines and books. There are definitely benefits. I get to sew. I feel the meditative qualities of putting fabric through the machine, but these quilts do not have souls. They don’t come from my heart. Branch out when you work from this book. Use the fabrics you have with confidence. There is always more fabric!

The next few sections have to do with fabrics (pg.6), thread (pg.8) and equipment (pg.9). Lucie brings her calm style to these sections. They don’t feel rote or the same as other books I have reviewed.

“How to Use this Book” (pg.10-11) is really important. It is a guide to how this book is written, how she uses measurements in more detail than in the introduction. A great idea is the section on “Building Blocks” (pg.12-39). It starts with a visual list of the block designs Ms. Summers considers basics. This is your basic guide and it is followed by instructions on how to make each block. The section includes 13 different blocks. The reader could spend years making quilts from these blocks alone. The possibilities are endless.

Because publishers seem to require patterns these days, the blocks section is followed by “The Quilts” (pg.40-113). Lucie’s quilts are really stunning, vibrant and have a lot of movement. They are designed and do not look messy. You can see this on the double page spread introducing the section (pg.40-41).

One of the things I like about this book is that Lucie Summers discusses her inspiration for each quilt. I can always use more of that. She doesn’t take pages to do it, but it is important to the process and valuable to the book. Each quilt ‘pattern’ in this section includes a brief rundown of the inspiration, a summary of techniques, design idea, design plan, “Make Me Key”, finished plan, and the piecing map. The design idea breaks down the design while the design plan is more involved. Lucie uses this section to dig into the design, talk about resting spots for your eyes, how she balances different areas and the differences in her design and the finished piece. The ‘Make Me Key’ is a sidebar that combines some text with visual cues to the elements of the quilt. The piecing map shows how the various sections are put together generally. YMMV. The sections for each quilt are robust.

It’s hard for me to decide which quilts I like best. I definitely like the the Shoe Boxes Quilt (pg.42-47). There is a section of the Seed Tray Quilt (pg.54-59) that is very appealing. The fabric cohesiveness and simple design of the Feathers Quilt (pg.60-65) is exciting, too. Many of the quilts have circles and I like those, such as the Bricks and Fences Quilt (pg.66-71), too. I think the Plates Quilt (pg.90-95) is appealing because it reminds me of the Eye of God quilt I made some years ago, has dots and a fabulous inspiration photo. There are no bad quilts in this book, but my favorite might be the Building Blocks Quilt (pg.108-113). Many of her quilts remind me of views of cities with domes and this one is no exception. I also like the quilting. With the large variety of quilts, readers will find something that appeals.

These quilts are designed not thrown together. The fabrics are chosen carefully and quilts are designed to make the overall piece look cohesive.

The last section is called General Techniques (pg. 115-124). The first subsection is called ‘Piecing’ (pg.115) and has a good discussion of why use a quarter inch seam in improv piecing as well as how chain piecing works. She discusses pressing (pg.116) including which way to press and why to press to the dark. Lucie also has a little bit of ergonomics thrown in. ‘Assembling Quilts’ (pg.116) includes what to do to get your quilt to hang straight. The section on Finishing Off Quilts includes the envelope method or ‘bagging out’ (pg.119) as Lucie calls it. There is a short section on quilting (pg.120) with some interesting quilt designs and a bit about marking quilt designs. The Binding section (pg.122-123) includes both facing* (called invisible binding here) and a mitered binding. The book wraps up with how to make a hanging sleeve and labeling your quilts (pg.124).

I might buy Quilt Improv. I like the fact that the author isn’t lazy and discusses the attributes of design within the improv context. The photographs are wonderful. The fabric choices are VERY appealing. Well worth taking a look at.

 

 

 

 

*Remember my tutorial on facings.

Finally Some Value

Sonja gave a short presentation on Composition at the CQFA meeting on Feb. 2. Sonja is a really good artist and works very hard to get better.  In 15-20 minutes, I learned so much about composition that my head was reeling. I talked about it with a number of people that I know. I was really excited.

First she talked about 8 Common Armatures. I had no idea what this means, but she showed us examples of the different armatures, which are arrangements of art on a page. The 8 are:

  • S curve
  • L
  • Diagonal
  • Triangle
  • Radial
  • Fulcrum
    • O-Frame focal point
    • O-Path around
  • Horizontals and verticals
  • Cruciform

Each of the above armatures can have subcategories. I talked a little bit about this in my Design Series post on Balance.

She also told us to work with intention. I took that to mean don’t just slap anything up on the quilt. She said to identify a center of interest and emphasize it, then she told us how.

Most of the class was taken up with Value. This started out to be a problem for me. For some time I have been irritated when people have said “Value does all the work and color gets all the glory.” Mostly, this saying has irritated me because nobody who said it could tell me why. I have ignored that saying since the first time I heard it.

Actually, I haven’t, but I was doing it intuitively and just using contrast. Contrast has a lot more to it than only value. You can review it in the design series episode on contrast.

First, we have to define value and contrast:

Definition of Value: Graduations of light and dark.  All colors have an inherent value.

Definition of Contrast: Difference in light and dark.  Or light vs dark. (See The Sharpened Artist).

The difference is a mind bender, but there is a difference.

Now we can get on to my epiphany.

In this presentation she talked about value patterns. She showed a diagram of 14 different examples of values in a composition. Each diagram shows 3 rectangles on a larger rectangular surface (presumably the paper or canvas or quilt). Each rectangle is either black, medium gray, light gray or white. In show different arrangements of these rectangles. Sonja showed us a page in Strengthen Your Paintings with Dynamic Composition. You can see what I am talking about a little bit in the arrangement of rectangles in the example on Jacob Bromeo’s site. You can see how the darker rectangles come forward.

There is a lot more I could say about this class. I have some books from the Library. I have some articles to read. I have some blogs posts to update.

Sonja recommended the following books. I got some of them from the library and am powering my way through them.

Resources:

Sonja does watercolors as well as make quilts. The above list is from her watercolor class, so there are things you have to ignore. The material on composition and value cross over from watercolor to quilts and are relevant.

Organizer Club So Far

After completing the All Rolled Up Tote, I thought I would layout the massive number of projects in the Crafty Gemini Organizer Club that I have completed.

Crafty Gemini Organizer Club completions, February 2019
Crafty Gemini Organizer Club completions, February 2019
Sewing Machine Mat from front
Sewing Machine Mat from front

Four.

Yes, I have completed 4 projects. I still have 3 more projects to go to complete the club. I do want to make all of the projects since I did sign up and pay for them. I did not sign up for the subsequent clubs since I have not yet finished the three projects left in the club. Also, I have a lot of other bags and organizer type projects I want to make.

I also want to make another Roadtrip Bag that has a vinyl window rather than using vinyl all the way across the front. I realize that is not the design, but I want to try my design change in order to not have to turn the vinyl. I am not sure how I will use the Roadtrip bag, but I like the design.

Crafty Gemini Organizer Club completions, February 2019-open
Crafty Gemini Organizer Club completions, February 2019-open

You can still buy the club (no affiliation). Check out the video showing all the projects.

Undercover Maker Mat Goes Out to Play

Undercover Maker Mat on Retreat
Undercover Maker Mat on Retreat

I took the Undercover Maker Mat on the CQFA Retreat. I got to try it out. That was why I made it.

I thought the front pockets worked pretty well. I can see where a pincushion might be handy, but I don’t plan to transfer my pins from pincushion to pincushion every time I use the mat.

I think the pockets would be more in use depending on the different projects I might be working on. I might use the larger selvage pocket on the left for a 6.5 inch ruler as needed. For what I did at the retreat having my snips and seam ripper handy was fine.

I had a couple of issues. First, you can see that the snips sleeve is in the pocket. Without the snips sleeve, my snips kept getting caught on the inside of the pocket. I added the snip sleeve because I didn’t want to cut the mat. Perhaps I should have used oilcloth for the inside of the pockets?

I didn’t notice it at the retreat, but I did notice it at the Jen Carlton Bailly class. I couldn’t get the legs of my Sew Steady table level when using the mat. I may want to make another mat that is larger so the Sew Steady doesn’t have to try and deal with different heights (mat/table).

None of this is fatal or a problem with the pattern.

Helping Out with Donation Quilts

Group Donation Quilt
Group Donation Quilt

I took Ends n.7 and the Green Strips Donation quilts over to Tim’s house the other day so he could quilt them. He has a bunch of quilts to quilt and said that a number of them need backs and batting.

This irritates me because I know that Tim does a lot of quilting for the guild. The least that people can do is get the quilt ready for quilting.  Still, the top is done and who knows what happened? Someone could have just managed to get the top done before s/he had to deal with some tragedy. Also, it gives me the opportunity to participate in a group project.

This is a fun and cheerful quilt. I brought it home in order to make a back so that Tim can quilt it. I kind of think it needs a border. The texture of the blocks, however, makes me want to do some piecing rather than just sew a plain border on to it. I have a number of other donation projects in process, so I have to decide if I want to add to the list with more piecing or just get this one done.

 

Green Thing Continues

Green Thing Donation Top or Block
Green Thing Donation Top or Block

I don’t know what this will be – block or quilt. I started it because I had some leftovers from the Green Strip donation quilt.

I thought I would just make a block, hand it over to Peggy and see what she could do with it. Somehow, it is has grown into this. It is about 22 x 22 inches now and I might as well just keep on using those green scraps to make it into a top. Another 10 inches on each side will not be difficult. I might even have enough scraps.

I am almost done with another row of small strips for the right side, which will add about 4 inches to it. I grab strips or pieces out of the green bin, sew them together into some kind of strip and attach it when it is long enough. I had some plainer strips leftover from the back of the Green Strip donation quilt and have been adding those as well.

There are a lot of small pieces so I am worried about the quilting (which I won’t be doing!) I am trying to reduce bulk by pressing all the seams open, which is a big pain.

If nothing else, this is a great way to get rid of scraps. It isn’t doing anything for my collection of donation blocks, however. Tim saw the photo I posted and said that it was much more interesting than the regular postage stamp blocks the guild normally makes. Perhaps I am just branching out and using some different inspiration to create beauty for others in need? I haven’t examined my inspiration much beyond wanting to use up scraps.

Quilty Birthday

2019 Birthday Gifts
2019 Birthday Gifts

No, my birthday is not in February, but I didn’t have a chance to show off my gifts until now. I am not trying to make anyone jealous.

It was a pretty big quilty birthday, which is not always the case. I got a new cutting mat. I have smaller cutting mats that go with me when I travel or participate in Sew Day. The mat I use in my workroom, however, is the one I got when I started making quilts more than 30 years ago! It was time for an upgrade and I am using and loving the new one. It does make a difference.

I received some new Tula dots. I’ll have to figure out something fabulous to make with them.

Charm square project tote
Charm square project tote

I also got a number of new project totes, which is great! I really like putting my projects in totes and keeping everything together. This little tote (right) fits charm squares. Not sure how I will use it, but will figure something out.

I haven’t tried everything out, but am slowly working my way through all the new stuff. I am so fortunate to have such great friends. It was so nice get things related to my passion.

City Sampler – Left Side Progress

City Sampler - left side done
City Sampler – left side done

I was feeling a little discouraged by my City Sampler Progress. I felt like I spent last weekend sewing and sewing and sewing and not getting anywhere. Then, all of a sudden, the whole left side is together!

That side has 36 blocks, so I am not yet halfway through, but I do feel like  it is significant progress.  I also don’t feel as discouraged. I have hope that I will be able to get this top together.

I am thinking of putting the border on that side before sewing the side to anything else. I think it will be easier than wrestling the quilt when it is finished.

26 Projects 2019 n.2

Finished 2019 Quilt Projects

Not much so far, but I am working on it.

Stepping Stones n.2 – finished January 1, 2019

Finished 2019 Non-Quilt Projects

This category covers bags, toys, aprons and knitting as well as other non-quilt projects.

Doing Good

  • Ends n.7 quilt top and back – finished 1/6/2019
  • Green Strips quilt top and back – finished 1/16/2019

In Process
The ‘In Process’ is used to denote projects on which I am actively working or are on the design wall waiting for me to stitch. I try not to put away projects, because that will ensure I never work on them

  • City Samplerblocks all made and on the design wall. I have started to sash the blocks with the intention of putting the top together. I have to, due to some seam allowance issues,  will have to adjust some of the blocks in some way – either ripping and resewing, adding a piece or two to the block, or with sashing. I am dealing with the problems as they come up in the piecing process. The big challenge is finding the fabric so I can replace pieces where necessary.
  • FOTY 2017 – pieces cut. Off  the design wall. I am counting and resorting the pieces while I work on the City Sampler
  • English Paper Piecing Project– half hexies – I work on this generally at night in front of the TV, so I made slow but steady progress. I am still thinking of my friend Faye whenever I work on it. She says that I have to think of this as my slow project.
  • Serendipity Lady Quilt: I was kind of surprised that I made progress. As mentioned in a previous post, I finished satin stitching the pieces on this project and am ready to baste it for quilting.

Still WIPs
I still have WIPs. Who doesn’t, after all? A project in the ‘UFO’ category means I am stalled. A nicer way of saying UFO is a WIP. The list is a lot shorter and the projects are newer, for the most part.

  1. Handbag Sampler – this is the forgotten project. The blocks were teaching samples when I taught a sampler class the time before I started writing the quilt class sampler tutorials. I found one block recently, but otherwise I actually don’t know exactly where the blocks are hiding. I have an idea and still have to crawl up in the far reaches of my fabric closet soon and see if I can find them. I haven’t even found a picture of all the blocks. Sad.
  2. Lobster – I still have more stitching to do and then I need to quilt it.
  3. Pies and Points from 2016 Victoria Findlay Wolfe class. Julie and I had a playdate towards the beginning of April. I brought this piece with me so I could cut more elements (Julie has a Sizzix). I lost my excitement about this piece and will have to get it back. I had to move this to the WIPs area.
  4. Pointillist Palette #4: Fourth is a series of 6 quilts; needs tiny square patches sewn together. No progress.
  5. Self Portrait: started in 2006 at a class at Quilting Adventures in Richmond, Virginia. I am still stalled on this again. As my oldest (I am pretty sure) UFO, I put it on my blog and out into the Twitterverse and Diane suggested that I not consider this as a self portrait. I think that strategy is a great idea. I am now trying to think of a new persona for her.
  6. Under the Sea: class project; The stitching has made the design much more appealing. I am also happier with the colors. I have worked on it regularly during Craft Night and am nearing the end of the embellishment. I keep saying that and, then, just add a bit more.
  7. Black and Red quilt – This came about because of two other projects. I made a whole bunch of bias tape as part of my failed attempt at doing the Mighty Lucky Club a few years ago. Another part of the inspiration came from my class with Tina of Little Blue Cottage fame. This was going to be for a nephew, but I think it will be for one of my SILs and BILs. I have rectangles cut and some bias tape ready. My next step is to sew the bias tape to the rectangles like pickup sticks. I don’t have any photos of this, so you’ll have to use your imagination.
  8. Who Am I? – This piece is up on my design and I keep meaning to work on it, but I haven’t. I am not sure why, but I don’t want it to end up like the Self-Portrait.

Small Projects in Process

Most of my progress involves thinking or just cutting.

  • 4-Zip Organizer – part of Crafty Gemini Organizer Club. It is on my list, but I haven’t actually started
  • Chubby Charmer with Good Fortune charm pack – gift; not started.
  • Classmates Bag n.2 – I cut out all the pieces (except maybe the vinyl), but haven’t sewn. I have to get this done by the beginning of March as it is for a friend.
  • Quick Curve Ruler lights tablerunner – The pieces are cut out and ready to sew
  • Retreat Organizer – another project from the Crafty Gemini Organizer Club, also on my list, but not yet started
  • Solid black cell phone wallet – The pieces are cut out and ready to sew
  • Ultimate Project Organizer – another project from the Crafty Gemini Organizer Club, also on my list, but not yet started
  • White on black dots cell phone wallet – The pieces are cut out and ready to sew

Ready for Quilting

  • None now

In Quilting Process

  • Aqua-Red Sampler –This is at the quilter. I took it in December
  • BAMaQG IRR –I have been working on this lately and am making progress. It is slow since it is hand quilting. I might add some more machine quilting to the project to move it along.
  • The MetroScape top is also finished and at the quilter
  • Theoretically, the Tarts Come to Tea is in the quilting process, though I haven’t worked on it in a while. Mom said she is really looking forward to me finishing it, which might be the incentive I need to get back to work on it.

Binding

nothing now

Hunting and Gathering

  • 30 Something: I continue to cut 1.5 inch squares. I am pretty sure I have the 800 I need, but I am not ready to sew them together yet, so whenever I have a chance to cut more I cut more. It will give me choice when the time comes.  I looked at whether I could start piecing this, but I found I need to cut some other sizes. I got those sizes on the cutting sheet and have a cut a few. I need over 600 of a size something like 1.75×3.75. I need some more accessories boxes to organize these new pieces. I’ll have to think up a new name for this quilt, too, since I am not using 1930s fabrics.
  • Blue Gradation Quilt: cutting 2.5 inch x 4.5 inch blue rectangles. It has to end sometime. I wasn’t sure I was ready to put this together, but I think I might be. I might do a couple of gradation quilts in a row just to get the practice.
  • Blue Lemonade: cutting blue, green, purple 2 inch squares. I used a lot of these squares for En Provence. I need more and have made some progress at Craft Night using the Accuquilt.
  • FOTY 2018: I have started cutting 2.5 inch squares for the 2018 version.
  • Pink Gradation Quilt: cutting 2.5 inch x 4.5 inch pink rectangles
  • Spin Wheel: really not started, but supplies gathered. I might have to cut some more background fabrics. I probably have enough fabrics and just need to decide to start.
  • Windmill quilt: Still hunting and gathering. I am supposed to be cutting a variety of greys for the background, which required the purchase of a new template. Cutting is very therapeutic, so I should try and do it when I have a few minutes.

Other

Gross usage is just over 10.40 yards YTD. My net is at about -.60 yards.  I got 10 yards of fabric for my birthday and it is early in the year. Stay tuned.

What’s on your list?

Still Working on the City Sampler

City Sampler, February 2019
City Sampler, February 2019

I took some time over the weekend to work on the City Sampler. It is slow going, but I am making progress.

Because of the seam allowance issues and the fact that the blocks are tiny, it is taking me time to sew the whole thing together. I know it is not a race and I have to keep telling myself that.

Maureen’s Pincushion

Maureen's pincushion
Maureen’s pincushion

In order to add a gift to Maureen’s bag, I made her a pincushion. Unlike the bag, the pincushion went together very smoothly. I had some of the pieces and parts from my last round of pincushion making on the cutting table. They weren’t crappy, just unused.

I picked out some other scraps from the unsorted pile on my cutting table and came up with a great selection. I am pleased with how it looks and don’t think it looks thrown together or disjointed at all.

Maureen's pincushion-with clips
Maureen’s pincushion-with clips

I saved time by not using selvages for the back. I just used a piece of the batik. As usual, I filled it with a combination of wool roving and Beanie Baby pellets.

I hope she likes it.