Tornado in the Workroom

Martini Napkin #2
Martini Napkin #2

I finished the Frosted Stars blocks as I mentioned, so I was a bit at loose ends for what to do next. I am planning to go out of town so I didn’t want to unwrap the Jelly Roll, which is required in the next step of the Frosted Stars quilt project, until I had time to press all of the strips with Mary Ellen’s Best Press. As I mentioned, with the Zig Zaggy quilt, it makes the Moda strips much easier to handle.

I looked around the workroom, which needed to be tidied in a BIG way, and saw a few half done household and charity projects.

Perfect.

I got to work.

The first was one napkin from the four (or 6?) that I cut out at the end of July/beginning of August. I don’t like making cloth napkins, but I like using cloth napkins. I also like the fabrics, most of which I would use for quilts.

Anyway, I straight stitched around the two FQs and then proceeded to perform the most odious task of napkin making, which is to press the seams, so that when I turn it inside out the bottom fold is the same width as the top fold. It never works and for some reason this drives me crazy. It takes me forever to even get it to a point where I can stand to use the napkins. Once I get this part done, it is ok. I find it especially humorous that the one person in our house not old enough to drink loves the Martini napkin. Very entertaining.

Anyway, this napkin is done. I have a yard and a half of 3 different kitchen related fabrics that are waiting to be napkins. I can’t wait.

Merit Badges October 2010
Merit Badges October 2010

The Court of Honor was on Friday and the Young Man was awarded 4 new merit badges. It took me forever to sew his last batch of merit badges on to his sash. In fact, I believe I did it the day of the Court of Honor. Since I was clearing off surfaces anyway, I sewed on the merit badges and resewed his troop numbers on. The handsewing I had done when he first joined the troop was coming undone and looked crappy.

He was awarded another 100 year special merit badge so I unsewed the one he had already received and sewed them on in such a way that they were symmetrical.

Anal, I know. I want them to look good, especially if I have to sew on all of these badges. Don’t get me started on my well developed and long rant about the BSA not having a sewing merit badge as an Eagle requirement. It is crazy to have a bunch of sewing that needs to be done and no merit badge to teach them how to do it. Another commentary for another day. I do need to remember to find some thread that matches the the shirt – a beigey color that I would never normally buy.

Million Pillowcase Challenge Pillowcase
Million Pillowcase Challenge Pillowcase

After doing a bit of unearthing, I found the parts for another pillowcase, so I sewed that together as as well. As I was doing the French Seam (remember Twiddletails directions for the burrito pillowcase?), I started wondering if I could do a French seam on the gift bags I make. I really like those French seams and am glad I learned how to do them.

I had a piece of fabric purchased recently for a gift bag. I thought I could make it quickly, so it had been hanging on the arm of my chair for a month or more. Since I was finishing things up, I decided today was the day to get that fabric off the arm of my chair.

Ribbon Candy Gift Bag
Ribbon Candy Gift Bag

I also decided it was the day to try a French seam on a gift bag. I am pleased with the way it came out.

French seam with Ribbon Tie
French seam with Ribbon Tie

My one concern was the ribbon tie. I insert a piece (usually recycled cloth ribbon) into the seam and reinforce it. I didn’t want the French seam to mess up the ribbon. I need the ribbon to close the bag. I couldn’t quite imagine how it work in my mind, so I tried it out. The key turned out to be just keeping the ribbon out of the way of the needle and inserting it properly in the first place. Above is the inside of the bag after I sewed the second seam.

Inside/Outside of Gift Bag
Inside/Outside of Gift Bag

Above is the bag with the right side facing out, but with the top folded back so you can see the French seam. I like the fact that there are no raw edges anymore. These bags get a work out even if it is just once a year and the French seam will make the ones with these seams last longer. You can also see how perfectly the ribbon comes out of the side. YAY!

This process kind of freshened up the process of making gift bags for me as well. I have a lot of Christmas fabrics needing to be made into gift bags, so perhaps I will do it now. I could make some for my SIL as a treat.

Author: Jaye

Quiltmaker who enjoys writing and frozen chocolate covered bananas.

2 thoughts on “Tornado in the Workroom”

  1. I love using French Seams for finishing things. I use them whenever and wherever they will allow me to! It must be catchy…working on odds and ends in the sewing rooms/studios. I’m doing that here too! Of course it helps that I have done all the sewing that is a must do for the rest of this year! The rest is all gravy. Please pass the napkin.
    😀

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