Food Quilt, part 2

Full top sans borders
Full top sans borders

As I mentioned in a previous post, back in July, this quilt is all about the fabric. I got down to it over Labor Day weekend and made the top. I still need to add borders, but the top is basically done.

You can see that the Disappearing 9 patch block means that there is an automatic border on two sides of the quilt. I don’t want a border on two sides of the quilt. I want the border (a border in this case) to be symmetrical, so I added a row of rectangles and squares.

Giant Food 9 Patch
Giant Food 9 Patch
Giant Food 9 Patch #2
Giant Food 9 Patch #2

 

These blocks actually are quite large. Each square in the block is 6.5″. Once you cut them into quarters they become a manageable size.

I was consistent about placement of red and black, so that the red would end up as cornerstones and the black would be the sashing. I fiddled around with the arrangement quite a bit, as I am wont to do. I wanted to vary the food prints that were next to each other as well as the location of the blacks.

Arranging
Arranging

This is what you get once you cut a 9 patch block into quarters and rearrange them. In fairness and honesty, the above are quarters from 4 different 9 patches. You would see the same red, if they were from the same 9 patch, but you get the point. Even if this was from the same 9 patch, there would be variety, because of the different blacks and the different focus fabrics.

Chunkin' It
Chunkin' It

Per TFQ’s instructions, I did chunk this quilt together. That method of putting together quilts works so much better for me than sewing blocks together in rows. I also find it easier to keep my blocks placed where I want them placed.

Author: Jaye

Quiltmaker who enjoys writing and frozen chocolate covered bananas.

6 thoughts on “Food Quilt, part 2”

  1. Jaye, I have a question about chunking. I’m a press the seams to one side kind of girl. How do you press your seams when chunking? The one quilt I tried this on is a mess of seams every which way. I like the process because I end up with rows that are inline, just wondering how to do the pressing.
    Thanks for any info you can share,
    Sue

    1. Hi Sue,
      I am also a pressing to one side kind of girl. I obsessively look at which way the seams are pressed for the neighbor block and press the seams on the other neighbor the opposite way. Sometimes I forget or moved a block to a new location and change the way the seams are going while sewing, then fix it when I get back to the ironing board.

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